needs


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needs

A general term referring to what a person requires to achieve and maintain health and well-being.

Types of needs
Physical, emotional, mental health, spiritual, environmental, social, sexual, financial and cultural.
References in periodicals archive ?
The hospital needs a steady flow of patients, and it needs to have them treated as expeditiously as possible and with the best achievable outcomes.
However, it is essential that they articulate the general needs of the warfighter in sufficient detail so that the S & T community can focus their efforts.
The needs of university students vary from academic, social to psychological.
What is VA doing to monitor the demand in the field for mental health services and what commitment have you made to ensure the resources are available to meet the needs of veterans seeking mental health services?
Self-reflection provided opportunities to understand the needs of students and make adjustments in my teaching as well as reflect on interactions with others, resulting in the development and building of relationships necessary to be more effective in this new position.
With a dearth of IT support staff, the last thing SMB needs is a complicated backup routine, or one that requires many manual steps.
Career guidance services can also be used to improve the responsiveness of educational institutions to the needs of consumers through advocacy on their behalf and through feedback to providers on their unmet needs.
The reality is that repeated studies of the dental needs of individuals with intellectual disabilities indicate that about half "...
They understand IT in context and, in planning, then factor in institutional objectives, organizational culture, customer interest and needs, information politics, legal requirements, educational and advisory needs, and the actual uses to which the information is put.
Only when these needs are met should other forms of protection be included.
The intensity of students' needs has led some to question whether school counseling programs are actually comprehensively meeting the needs of all students (Green & Keys, 2001; Whiston, 2002).