needle

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needle

 [ne´d'l]
a sharp instrument used for suturing, for puncturing, or for the guiding of ligatures.
aneurysm needle a blunt-pointed, curved needle with the eye at the point; used for passing ligatures around aneurysms or vessels.
aspirating needle a long, hollow needle for removing fluid from a cavity.
atraumatic needle an eyeless surgical needle with the suture attached to a hollow end.
biopsy needle a hollow needle with an inner needle that detaches tissue for biopsy and brings it to the surface of its lumen; types include the Menghini and Silverman needles. See also needle biopsy.
cataract needle one used in removing a cataract.
discission needle a special form of cataract needle.
fine needle a very thin, highly flexible steel needle with a narrow inner core used to cannulate very small bile ducts to perform transhepatic cholangiography (fine needle transhepatic cholangiography).
Hagedorn's needle a form of flat suture needle.
hypodermic needle a hollow, sharp-pointed needle to be attached to a hypodermic syringe for injection of solutions.
knife needle a slender knife with a needle-like point, used in ophthalmic operations.
ligature needle a long-handled, slender steel needle having an eye in its curved end, used for passing a ligature underneath an artery.
Menghini needle a needle for liver biopsy, not requiring rotation to cut loose the tissue specimen.
Reverdin's needle a surgical needle with an eye that can be opened and closed by means of a slide.
scalp vein needle a short rigid needle with flexible wings on each side; used to infuse IV fluids for short periods of time, in patients with small veins or in children.
Silverman needle a biopsy needle for taking tissue specimens, consisting of an outer cannula and an inner split needle with a longitudinal groove in which tissue is retained when the needle is withdrawn.
skinny needle fine needle.
spatula needle a minute needle with a flat or slightly curved concave surface that does not cut or pierce.
stop needle one with a shoulder that prevents too deep penetration.
swaged needle a needle with no eye, having suture attached to a hollow end.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl),
1. A slender, solid, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. A hollow needle used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a vessel or other space.
3. To separate the tissues by means of one or two needles, in the dissection of small parts.
4. To perform discission of a cataract with a knife needle.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

needle

(nēd′l)
n.
1. A slender, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around an artery.
2. A hollow, slender, sharp-pointed instrument used for injection or aspiration.
v.
To separate tissues by means of one or two needles in the dissection of small parts.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

needle

A fine, elongated stainless steel tube with a narrow central bore for injecting and withdrawing fluids.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

needle

Medtalk An elongated device with a narrow central bore for injection and withdrawing fluids. See Biopsy needle, Butterfly needle, Colposuspension needle, Extended reach needle, Safe Stepblood-collection needle.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl)
1. A slender, solid, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. A hollow needle used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a vessel or other space.
3. To separate the tissues by means of one or two needles, in the dissection of small parts.
4. To perform discission of a cataract by means of a knife needle.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl)
1. Slender, usually sharp-pointed instrument used to puncture tissues, suture, or pass a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. Hollow device used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a space.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about needle

Q. I am thinking are there any other ways to pressurize or use these points apart from needles? hi all…I was advised by my practitioner to pressurize on the acupuncture points regularly using needle and it is painless. I am thinking are there any other ways to pressurize or use these points apart from needles?

A. Yes…there are some other techniques available where they can excite the points for the same effect as acupuncture points which may give some additional benefits. Techniques used are moxibustion, essential oils and now even laser biostimulation is gaining popularity.

More discussions about needle
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References in periodicals archive ?
Needlers get paid per interaction, whether or not they make a sale, but the real benefits of working for Needle are the flexible hours, work-from-anywhere convenience, and opportunities to earn products from the companies they represent.
When he had the opportunity to save taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars for lifetime healthcare for (Needler), he refused to do it," said Virtuoso.
Also, it is difficult to discern from the tagging studies how much of the movements are seasonal migrations of more or less distinct stocks, and how much interchange there is between these stocks (Needler, 1930).
Come together Renfrewshire's Provost Lorraine Cameron with artist Mandy McIntosh, Carol Anderson from SWIFT, and Feegie Needlers Linda Connor and Jillian Murning
And while initially it looks like she has the coffin-box of stall two, the statistics often become unhinged in the Hilary Needler.
Being drawn in gate 10 will also be a crucial fillip in the Hilary Needler, after which White Shift is likely to head for the Queen Mary at Royal Ascot.
Beverley's Hilary Needler Trophy looks as informative as ever, with several possible Royal Ascot contenders waiting in the wings.
Mike Needler is known in board rooms across the country as an industry leader, so it came as no surprise last year when he was elected to serve as vice chairman of the National Grocers Association.
TIM EASTERBY has set his sights on winning the Queen Mary stakes at Royal Ascot for the second year running after Good Girl won a thrilling Listed Hilary Needler Trophy at Beverley last night.
It stands out because the feature races are for two-year-olds, with the pair of PS25,000 conditions contests - the Hilary Needler Trophy for fillies and the Brian Yeardley Continental Two-Year-Old Trophy for colts and geldings - both long-established events at this independent East Yorkshire course.
GEESALA (K Ryan) THE two-year-old landed the Hillary Needler Trophy at Beverley in midweek in tenacious fashion.
Owner Gabrielle Needler, 11, of Reigate, Surrey, said: "It normally only takes five minutes.