needle

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needle

 [ne´d'l]
a sharp instrument used for suturing, for puncturing, or for the guiding of ligatures.
aneurysm needle a blunt-pointed, curved needle with the eye at the point; used for passing ligatures around aneurysms or vessels.
aspirating needle a long, hollow needle for removing fluid from a cavity.
atraumatic needle an eyeless surgical needle with the suture attached to a hollow end.
biopsy needle a hollow needle with an inner needle that detaches tissue for biopsy and brings it to the surface of its lumen; types include the Menghini and Silverman needles. See also needle biopsy.
cataract needle one used in removing a cataract.
discission needle a special form of cataract needle.
fine needle a very thin, highly flexible steel needle with a narrow inner core used to cannulate very small bile ducts to perform transhepatic cholangiography (fine needle transhepatic cholangiography).
Hagedorn's needle a form of flat suture needle.
hypodermic needle a hollow, sharp-pointed needle to be attached to a hypodermic syringe for injection of solutions.
knife needle a slender knife with a needle-like point, used in ophthalmic operations.
ligature needle a long-handled, slender steel needle having an eye in its curved end, used for passing a ligature underneath an artery.
Menghini needle a needle for liver biopsy, not requiring rotation to cut loose the tissue specimen.
Reverdin's needle a surgical needle with an eye that can be opened and closed by means of a slide.
scalp vein needle a short rigid needle with flexible wings on each side; used to infuse IV fluids for short periods of time, in patients with small veins or in children.
Silverman needle a biopsy needle for taking tissue specimens, consisting of an outer cannula and an inner split needle with a longitudinal groove in which tissue is retained when the needle is withdrawn.
skinny needle fine needle.
spatula needle a minute needle with a flat or slightly curved concave surface that does not cut or pierce.
stop needle one with a shoulder that prevents too deep penetration.
swaged needle a needle with no eye, having suture attached to a hollow end.

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl),
1. A slender, solid, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. A hollow needle used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a vessel or other space.
3. To separate the tissues by means of one or two needles, in the dissection of small parts.
4. To perform discission of a cataract with a knife needle.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]

needle

(nēd′l)
n.
1. A slender, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around an artery.
2. A hollow, slender, sharp-pointed instrument used for injection or aspiration.
v.
To separate tissues by means of one or two needles in the dissection of small parts.

needle

A fine, elongated stainless steel tube with a narrow central bore for injecting and withdrawing fluids.

needle

Medtalk An elongated device with a narrow central bore for injection and withdrawing fluids. See Biopsy needle, Butterfly needle, Colposuspension needle, Extended reach needle, Safe Stepblood-collection needle.

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl)
1. A slender, solid, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. A hollow needle used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a vessel or other space.
3. To separate the tissues by means of one or two needles, in the dissection of small parts.
4. To perform discission of a cataract by means of a knife needle.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl)
1. Slender, usually sharp-pointed instrument used to puncture tissues, suture, or pass a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. Hollow device used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a space.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]

Patient discussion about needle

Q. I am thinking are there any other ways to pressurize or use these points apart from needles? hi all…I was advised by my practitioner to pressurize on the acupuncture points regularly using needle and it is painless. I am thinking are there any other ways to pressurize or use these points apart from needles?

A. Yes…there are some other techniques available where they can excite the points for the same effect as acupuncture points which may give some additional benefits. Techniques used are moxibustion, essential oils and now even laser biostimulation is gaining popularity.

More discussions about needle
References in periodicals archive ?
Needle stick injuries are generally under reported5 and data regarding them are usually sparse, especially, in developing countries like Pakistan6.
The questionnaire consisted of a simple tick box format with few open ended questions and with sections for demographic items, type of device that caused the injury, number of needle stick injuries, causes, training, reporting of injuries, personal protective equipment, working conditions and duty shifts.
PEP for needle stick injuries from HIV positive sources includes 2 or 3 anti-retrovirals and warrants logistic support in terms of ready availability of a "starter pack" of these drugs being kept in the Emergency Room (ER) with sufficient drugs for 48 h so that injuries on week ends can immediately be initiated on treatment.
"Police officers, front line workers and often young children who come across these needles are at risk of contracting highly infectious blood-borne diseases through needle stick injuries.
Health-care workers are a high-risk group for accidental needle stick injuries, infection, illness, stress and workplace abuse and violence.
The suit alleged that such non-safety devices are defectively designed, resulting in unnecessary secondary needle stick injuries to thousands of Ohio health care workers, and created an unreasonable risk of harm that easily could have been prevented by the use of alternative, safer designs incorporating post-use protection for exposed needles.
'Needle stick injuries are a common problem for health services around the world and occur when a person inadvertently pricks themselves with a used needle,' he said.
The agreement grants to UNIVEC the exclusive worldwide rights to manufacture, use, market, and sell UME's patented protective shield designed to protect health care workers and others from needle stick injuries associated with hypodermic syringes.
Influences of an educational program and mechanical opening needle disposal boxes on occupational needle stick injuries. Infection control and hospital epidemiology, 12(12), 725-731.
The global smart syringes market is driven by the rise in count of needle stick injuries, shift from conventional syringes to smart syringes, growth in awareness in the emerging economies, and widespread adoption of safety syringes across all applications, especially in drug delivery.
Most maxillofacial surgeons sustain about three needle stick injuries each year.8 The current study will help us and our colleagues to introduce a new modality for IMF which is less invasive and time sparing technique.