needle phobia


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Related to needle phobia: Trypanophobia

needle phobia

Morbid fear of needles, pins and other sharp objects, which is usually understood to mean morbid fear of hypodermic needles. Unlike the cornucopia of invented lexical phobias—e.g., arachibutyrophobia, the morbid fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of one’s mouth; cathisophobia, the morbid fear of sitting down; or lachanophobia, the morbid fear of vegetables—needle phobia is a genuine morbid fear, and has engendered a body of research into the neurologic and psychological responses to needles.

None of the proposed lexical alternatives—aichmophobia, belonephobia, enetophobia, trypanophobia—are in common use or more commonly understood than the more simplistic needle phobia.
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This often leads to a secondary fear of fainting which exacerbates anxiety and reinforces the original needle phobia.
Although this method is very effective, its application is difficult for patients with needle phobia. Needle phobia represents a serious problem for at least 10% of the population.4 Refusal of regional anesthesia by obstetric patients was investigated previously by Gajraj et al., and it was found that the most common reason for refusal was fear of needle placement rate of 28%.18 For this reason a noninvasive, nontraumatic and painless method that provides a rapid onset of TM analgesia is required.
I travelled straight to Edinburgh and Smile Dentist sorted me out and even succeeded in getting me to overcome my needle phobia by giving me two jags before fitting me with a temporary plastic tooth.
Did you know that about 10-15% of the world's population has a significant degree of needle phobia? Conditioning negative experiences, mostly pain, can lead to the postponement or avoidance of medical and dental visits and, for some, job applications or even marital licenses where blood tests are required.
This may be related to needle phobia, a specific phobia, blood-injection injury subtype (19) in the DSM-4.
But evidence is growing that using today's shorter needles provides the same efficacy, safety and tolerability as longer devices while simultaneously reducing needle phobia. Importantly, patient adherence increases, eventually leading to lower health care costs.
"I was always interested in midwifery, though, but I had a terrible needle phobia and that put me off the idea for years."
The optimization of other parenteral systems also focuses on the patients' compliance, reflecting the awareness of fears such as needle phobia. Auto injectors are usually loaded using pre-filled syringes and feature a needle cover keeping the needle hidden as long as possible.
Instead, a series of social factors relegate injectable formulations to second-line status: needle phobia in patients, a modest amount of pain that can occur when antipsychotic drugs are injected into muscle, the lack of comfort that psychiatrists often have with performing injections, and the need for a psychiatrist to obtain and have the drug on hand as opposed to the convenience of writing a prescription for the patient to get the oral form.
Needle phobia can be defined as a fear of sharp objects such as pins or needles.
Lamb, who has posted a website called "The Needle Phobia Information Site," (www.needlephobia.com) traces his phobia back to childhood inoculations.