needle


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needle

 [ne´d'l]
a sharp instrument used for suturing, for puncturing, or for the guiding of ligatures.
aneurysm needle a blunt-pointed, curved needle with the eye at the point; used for passing ligatures around aneurysms or vessels.
aspirating needle a long, hollow needle for removing fluid from a cavity.
atraumatic needle an eyeless surgical needle with the suture attached to a hollow end.
biopsy needle a hollow needle with an inner needle that detaches tissue for biopsy and brings it to the surface of its lumen; types include the Menghini and Silverman needles. See also needle biopsy.
cataract needle one used in removing a cataract.
discission needle a special form of cataract needle.
fine needle a very thin, highly flexible steel needle with a narrow inner core used to cannulate very small bile ducts to perform transhepatic cholangiography (fine needle transhepatic cholangiography).
Hagedorn's needle a form of flat suture needle.
hypodermic needle a hollow, sharp-pointed needle to be attached to a hypodermic syringe for injection of solutions.
knife needle a slender knife with a needle-like point, used in ophthalmic operations.
ligature needle a long-handled, slender steel needle having an eye in its curved end, used for passing a ligature underneath an artery.
Menghini needle a needle for liver biopsy, not requiring rotation to cut loose the tissue specimen.
Reverdin's needle a surgical needle with an eye that can be opened and closed by means of a slide.
scalp vein needle a short rigid needle with flexible wings on each side; used to infuse IV fluids for short periods of time, in patients with small veins or in children.
Silverman needle a biopsy needle for taking tissue specimens, consisting of an outer cannula and an inner split needle with a longitudinal groove in which tissue is retained when the needle is withdrawn.
skinny needle fine needle.
spatula needle a minute needle with a flat or slightly curved concave surface that does not cut or pierce.
stop needle one with a shoulder that prevents too deep penetration.
swaged needle a needle with no eye, having suture attached to a hollow end.

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl),
1. A slender, solid, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. A hollow needle used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a vessel or other space.
3. To separate the tissues by means of one or two needles, in the dissection of small parts.
4. To perform discission of a cataract with a knife needle.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]

needle

(nēd′l)
n.
1. A slender, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around an artery.
2. A hollow, slender, sharp-pointed instrument used for injection or aspiration.
v.
To separate tissues by means of one or two needles in the dissection of small parts.

needle

A fine, elongated stainless steel tube with a narrow central bore for injecting and withdrawing fluids.

needle

Medtalk An elongated device with a narrow central bore for injection and withdrawing fluids. See Biopsy needle, Butterfly needle, Colposuspension needle, Extended reach needle, Safe Stepblood-collection needle.

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl)
1. A slender, solid, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. A hollow needle used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a vessel or other space.
3. To separate the tissues by means of one or two needles, in the dissection of small parts.
4. To perform discission of a cataract by means of a knife needle.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl)
1. Slender, usually sharp-pointed instrument used to puncture tissues, suture, or pass a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. Hollow device used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a space.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]

Patient discussion about needle

Q. I am thinking are there any other ways to pressurize or use these points apart from needles? hi all…I was advised by my practitioner to pressurize on the acupuncture points regularly using needle and it is painless. I am thinking are there any other ways to pressurize or use these points apart from needles?

A. Yes…there are some other techniques available where they can excite the points for the same effect as acupuncture points which may give some additional benefits. Techniques used are moxibustion, essential oils and now even laser biostimulation is gaining popularity.

More discussions about needle
References in periodicals archive ?
The needles market was valued at US$ 5.75 billion in 2017 and is expected to witness a robust CAGR of 7.6% over the forecast period (2017-2025).
Another way to prevent leakage is to pull the skin taut across the injection site with one hand while you inject with the other, then release the skin after you remove the needle. The skin then moves over the hole and closes it.
The Peoria Republican initially introduced HB2148 to legalize needle exchanges, but was forced to turn to an alternative plan when his bill stalled in the House Health and Human Services Committee when its chairwoman Rep.
But for others, if they're located in a certain area or have several close together, they can raise concerns about exposed needles being discarded in public areas and attract people who inject drugs in public.
Surgeons at theKaraboloHospitalin the Tajik capital ofDushanbewho operated upon the boy were able to remove six of the needles. "The needles were not new.
The family members of the child say they do not know how the needles got into the child.
In the designs below, a larger wing needle (120/19) than recommended was incorporated for step one to produce a slightly more pronounced effect.
At the same time, if the sewing needle is not correctly selected with respect to the fabric construction, the sewability of fabric becomes poor in the final product.
With shorter needles, such as the UltraFine, people with diabetes are less likely to accidentally inject their insulin dose into a muscle.
Conclusion: Needle-free delivery of lidocaine is an effective, easy to-use and noninvasive method of providing local anesthesia for the epidural needle insertion.