necropsy

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Related to necropsies: autopsist, autopsied

autopsy

 [aw´top-se]
examination of a body after death to determine the cause of death; it may be ordered by a coroner or medical examiner when the cause of death is unknown or the death has taken place under suspicious circumstances. Autopsies are also valuable sources of medical knowledge. Unless it is demanded by public authorities, an autopsy cannot be performed without permission of the next of kin of the deceased. Called also postmortem examination and necropsy.

au·top·sy

(aw'top-sē), Avoid the mispronunciation autop'sy.
1. An examination of the organs of a dead body to determine the cause of death or to study the pathologic changes present. Synonym(s): necropsy
2. In the terminology of the ancient Greek school of empirics, the intentional reproduction of an effect, event, or circumstance that occurred in the course of a disease, and observation of its influence in ameliorating or aggravating the patient's symptoms.
[G. autopsia, seeing with one's own eyes]

necropsy

(nĕk′rŏp′sē)
n. pl. necrop·sies

nec′rop′sy v.

autopsy

A postmortem examination of a body, which helps determine cause of death and identify any diseases that had not been detected while the patient was alive, or which confirms the presence of conditions diagnosed before the patient died.

Autopsy types 
• Biopsy only—A minimalist postmortem examination in which the prosector examines the organs, but only samples small fragments (biopsies) for histologic examination. 
• Chest only—An autopsy in which only the lungs and heart are examined; findings in a chest only autopsy are used to ID an occluding thrombus in the coronary arteries, massive patientE, or evaluate a person for compensation under the Black Lung Compensation act of 1969.
• Complete—An autopsy in which the thoracic, abdominal and cranial cavities are examined. 
• Head only—An autopsy in which the pathology of interest is presumed to reside entirely in the cranial cavity. 
• No head—An autopsy examining the chest and abdominal cavity without cranial cavity.

Infections (potentially fatal) that may pass to prosectors
Blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, diphtheria, erysipeloid, HBV (30% of seroconversion with infected blood exposure), HCV (up to 10% risk), HIV (0.3% risk), lymphocytic choriomeningitis, rabies, streptococci, TB (exposures as brief as 10 minutes have resulted in transmission; 10% of Finnish pathologists in active PM practice have occupational TB; autopsy-transmitted outbreaks of TB have occurred in NY, LA, Chicago and Arkansas), tularaemia, viral haemorrhagic fevers (Marburg, Ebola, Lassa), yellow fever. Two cases of possible transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to histology technicians (not autopsy prosectors) have been reported.

necropsy

Postmortem examination. See Autopsy.

au·top·sy

(aw'top-sē)
An examination of a corpse and the organs of a dead body to determine the cause of death or to study the pathologic changes present. (Colloquially called postmortem or post.)
Synonym(s): necropsy.
[G. autopsia, seeing with one's own eyes]

necropsy

An autopsy, or postmortem examination, of a body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Much of the literature examining how the autopsy impacts medical students has been related to examining students' attitudes toward observing necropsies. (3,5-10) The purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which postmortem examinations are currently being used in preclinical medical education.
A major problem is increasing the number of necropsies, which may be limited by logistics or cultural norms.
We performed necropsies on seven olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea), two green (Chelonia mydas), and two leatherback sea turtles (Table 1).
Subsequent necropsies confirmed that no grossly visible parasites, including nematodes, trematodes, cestodes, pentastomids, and acanthocephalans were present (McFarlen, 1991), at least in the adult female terrapins that were mortally injured by traffic.
Necropsies of 4 moose in North Dakota were not entirely conclusive, but suggested that grain overload occurred and was a cause of mortality.
Containers for providing the location to perform necropsies of the seals; the staff of the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality (LNV-Noord) for providing access to and help with the centralized seal registration data; the Common Wadden Sea Secretariat and the Trilateral Seal Expert Group for international coordination of the outbreak; Fiona Read for her help with geographic coordinates; Xavier Harduin for help in entering and analyzing data; Robin Huisman for help with the Geographic Information Systems program; and Hans Heesterbeek, Rik de Swart, and Cock van Duijn for reviewing the manuscript at different stages of development.
Three of these birds were euthanatized, and complete necropsies were performed.
Two of the sick prairie dogs at the affected pet store were euthanized, and necropsies were performed (2).
Necropsies were performed systematically on 30 frogs, but no gross abnormalities of the viscera were found.