necrolysis


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necrolysis

 [nĕ-krol´ĭ-sis]
separation or exfoliation of necrotic tissue.
toxic epidermal necrolysis an exfoliative skin disease in which erythema spreads rapidly over the body, followed by blisters much like those seen in a second degree burn. It may be caused by drug reactions, infections (viral, bacterial, or fungal), neoplastic disease, graft-versus-host reaction, and chemical exposure.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ne·crol·y·sis

(nĕ-krol'i-sis),
Necrosis and loosening of tissue.
[necro- + G. lysis, loosening]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ne·crol·y·sis

(nĕ-krol'i-sis)
Necrosis and loosening of tissue.
[necro- + G. lysis, loosening]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Retrospective analysis of steven Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis over a period of 5 years from northern Karnataka, India.
Skin and mucosal lesions of toxic epidermal necrolysis
(21) Adverse skin reactions to SSRIs are rare, but extremely severe: toxic epidermal necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson's syndrome, leukocytoclastic vasculitis and purpuric erythema on sun-exposed areas.
Wolkenstein, "Scorten: A severity-of-illness score for toxic epidermal necrolysis," Journal of Investigative Dermatology, vol.
Sheu, "Erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis: acute ocular manifestations, causes, and management," Cornea, vol.
Erythema multiforme and toxic epidermal necrolysis; p.
Conclusion: Anticonvulsants, antibiotics and non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs play a major role in the etiology of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Anticonvulsants are associated with severe disease.
Drug-Induced Skin Reactions Drug-Induced Skin Reactions (N = 52) N (%) Morbilliform Drug Eruption 26 (50%) Stevens-Johnson Syndrome 11 (21%) Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis 5 (10%) DRESS 5 (10%) Fixed Drug Eruption 2 (4%) Purpuric Drug Eruption 1 (2%) Acneiform Drug Eruption 1 (2%) Bullous Drug Eruption 1 (2%) DRESS: Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms
Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis is a variant of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.
He developed Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), which progressed to toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and death over a period of 26 days.
He was later diagnosed with Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, a more severe form of the syndrome.
SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are two forms of this life-threatening skin condition in which cell death causes the epidermis to separate from the dermis.