necrology


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necrology

 [nĕ-krol´o-je, ne-krol´o-je]
statistics or records of death. adj., adj necrolog´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ne·crol·o·gy

(nĕ-krol'ŏ-jē),
The science of the collection, classification, and interpretation of mortality statistics.
[necro- + G. logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

necrology

(1) An obituary notice;
(2) A list of deaths.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ne·crol·o·gy

(nĕ-krol'ŏ-jē)
The science of the collection, classification, and interpretation of mortality statistics.
[necro- + G. logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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"Memoirs of Mary Wollstonecraft." Annual Necrology, for 1797-8.
Sociologist Norman Mirsky claimed that it was "virtually impossible to find a Reform Jewish home in the 1950s without a copy of Leon Uris's Exodus." (Necrology, 668), and in a letter to Stephen Whitfield, dated April 16, 1985, Uris revealed that "I have received thousands of letters in the last quarter of a century from people telling me how Exodus has substantially changed their lives ...
By 1880, this "sprightly American authoress," as the Literary World called her, had taken over the post of editor ("Necrology" 356).
Appendices include a list of Lane's staff, Jayhawker casualties and a necrology that describes the regiments and commanders of the Tenth Kansas Infantry.
She has thus opened up a new field of study that takes us far beyond the genre perhaps most associated with convents, the necrology. And while individual figures such as the three Saint Catherines--of Siena, Bologna, and Genova--have been the focus of recent (though hardly sufficient) attention, Weaver's attentiveness to an entire tradition has enabled scholars to move away from individual case studies and examine, as Kate Lowe has recently done, a cluster of phenomena relevant to that ubiquitous institution in medieval and early modern Europe in which women did have spaces of their own.
The next chapter, aptly named "The Mourning After," is on Marie Redonnet, who began "her fictional necrology in 1985, with the publication of a series of minimalist poems, inspired by a personal death" (107).
Parrino's exemplary practice--some might say intentionally defeatist practice--can't help but throw up roadblocks that both frustrate the best intentions to "keep the work alive" and circumvent the worst aspects of museumification that so often usher artists into necrology. While there is no catalogue for the show, an issue of the magazine Palais was devoted to Parrino, and it brings together his work, works by other artists, and his personal obsessions in images and in text in a far livelier way--as if the artist himself had produced a zine to accompany the exhibition.
Social Facilitation included announcements of individual's achievements, job changes, special events, and necrology. The final category, Organizational Business, covered information about annual conventions, district meetings, NEA information, and notifications of TSAT business.
Standing Committees where there is some flexibility in appointments include the Legislative Affairs Committee, Membership Committee, Necrology Committee, Nominating Committee, Strategic Planning Committee, and the Structure and Function Committee.
While some of her sources, such as medical texts, painting, and necrology, are either gender neutral or discuss both males and females, the overwhelming weight of the evidence deals with elite male experience.
The shear volume of his publications, however, makes it impossible to enumerate them all in this brief necrology. Nevertheless, they constitute a lasting tribute and permanent record of his scholarly excellence.