neck of the femur


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Related to neck of the femur: intertrochanteric fracture

neck of the femur

The heavy column of bone that connects the head of the femur to the shaft.
See also: neck
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly Renis reported that P1NP is significantly and negatively correlated with BMD at spine, total hip and neck of the femur level32.
Population differences in the geometry of the proximal femur have also been used to explain differences in the incidence of fractures of the neck of the femur in different populations.
The longitudinal axis of the neck of the femur in horizontal plane was determined by bisecting the anteroposterior diameter of the neck both at proximal and distal ends with the help of Vernier calipers (Figure 2) and to make it easy, a small sized smooth K-wire was mounted along the proximal and distal bisecting points.
Skovgaard et al., "Observer variation in the radiographic classification of fractures of the neck of the femur using Garden's system," International Orthopaedics, vol.
The head of the femur is joined to the bone shaft by a narrow piece of bone called the neck of the femur.
Traumatic posterior dislocation of hip joint with a fracture of the head and neck of the femur of the same side: a case report.
"The arterial blood supply to the humerus and other bones such as the neck of the femur is highly conserved.
Fractures of the neck of the femur have long been recognized as a major complication following resurfacing.
DXA can be used to determine the density of various bones in the body but the lumbar spine (L1-L4) and the neck of the femur are most frequently used and validated (4).
This distinction is important for the correct management of these fractures as prosthetic replacement is recommended in elderly patients for a displaced intracapsular fracture of the neck of the femur [1,2]; undisplaced intracapsular and extracapsular femoral neck fractures are usually fixed internally with a compression device.
In total hip replacement, the orthopedic surgeon lops off the bulbous head and angled neck of the femur and puts in its place a ball-like prosthesis that is secured by a spike inserted deep into the lower portion of the bone.
The head and neck of the femur are offset from each other, so it becomes prominent on the front side and causes impingement as the child brings the hip up into flexion.