necessity

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necessity

 [nĕ-ses´ĭ-te]
something necessary or indispensable.
pharmaceutic necessity (pharmaceutical necessity) a substance having slight or no value therapeutically, but used in the preparation of various pharmaceuticals, including preservatives, solvents, ointment bases, and flavoring, coloring, diluting, emulsifying, and suspending agents.

necessity

/ne·ces·si·ty/ (nĕ-ses´ĭ-te) something necessary or indispensable.
pharmaceutical necessity  a substance having slight or no value therapeutically, but used in the preparation of various pharmaceuticals, including preservatives, solvents, ointment bases, and flavoring, coloring, diluting, emulsifying, and suspending agents.

necessity

[nĕses′te]
something necessary or indispensable.

necessity

See Medical necessity.
References in periodicals archive ?
DTI-Negros Occidental in a statement said, unless sooner lifted by the President, price control of basic necessities shall remain effective for the duration of the condition that brought it about, but not more than 60 days.
Larry Bush, Marketing Director at Traidcraft said: "During a very recent trip to Bangladesh, we asked farmers what their top necessities in life were and they listed things like electricity, irrigation systems for the fields, and food on the table.
Only basic necessities are covered by the price freeze.
Likewise, publicly consumed necessities attracted more peer influence than private consumed luxuries and privately consumed necessities.
The Bare Necessities Car is being designed under the Chevrolet brand and is penned to be the 'car with the lowest cost per mile of any four-seater on the road'.
Star Parade, carrying 112 pounds - nine less than runner-up Adoration and seven less than third-place Bare Necessities - finished in 1:41.
To better coordinate marketing, fund development, volunteer management, training and community relations, for this agency which provides basic necessities of life in West Niagara.
Art is for most people a luxury to be indulged after we have completed the necessities of living.
Their mission was not to provide food, water, shelter, or other necessities of life, but to distribute the "necessities" of death.
Earthly Necessities is an unusual and welcome book.
The following essays by Colin Jones, Rebecca Sprang, and Maxine Berg challenge traditional historiographical interpretations and underscore the fluid relationship between luxuries and necessities in eighteenth-century France and Britain.