nearest relative

nearest relative

A person—usually a partner, but in some cases a child, parent or even a friend—who, under the Mental Health Act 1983 (UK), can be regarded as the nearest relative of a particular person. A nearest relative has a number of important powers and functions in an individual’s care and in decisions related to that person’s health, including the right to discharge an individual who has been formally detained in hospital, apply for admission for assessment, treatment or guardianship, and to challenge an application for involuntary treatment or guardianship being made by an Approved Mental Health Worker.
References in classic literature ?
For, after all, I AM a distant kinsman of yours--the seventh drop of water in the pudding, as the proverb has it--yet still a kinsman, and at the present time your nearest relative and protector, seeing that where you had the right to look for help and protection, you found only treachery and insult.
Sh e places herself under the protection of her nearest relative, until her character is vindicated and her position in your house is once more beyond a doubt.
Wilson refused to suspect Tom; for first, Tom couldn't murder anybody--he hadn't character enough; secondly, if he could murder a person he wouldn't select his doting benefactor and nearest relative; thirdly, self-interest was in the way; for while the uncle lived, Tom was sure of a free support and a chance to get the destroyed will revived again, but with the uncle gone, that chance was gone too.
"But am I not your nearest relative?" demanded Milady, with a tone of the most touching ingenuousness.
"Well, something was worrying him the night before, and if it was to do with money it is possible that he would make for his nearest relative, who had so much of it, though from all I have heard he would not have much chance of getting it.
Glenarm had at once shown it to her nearest relative, Captain Newenden.
It is well within my experience, that young ladies of rank and position do occasionally have private debts which they dare not acknowledge to their nearest relatives and friends.
He has repeatedly stated that the current law ties the PNP's hands, because a child, if he is in police custody, has to be released within eight hours to his parents, guardian or nearest relative, implying that the child actually goes scot-free, possibly to repeat the offense again and again.
Children nine years old and below shall be released to the custody of their parents or their nearest relative in the absence thereof subject to community-based intervention program supervised by the local Social Welfare and Development it has been evaluated that it is for his best interest that he/she be referred to a child youth facility or Bahay Pagasa managed by the local government units (LGUs) or a licensed and accredited non-government organizations (NGOs) monitored by the DSWD.
"Children nine years and below shall be released to the custody of their parents or their nearest relative in the absence thereof subject to community-based intervention program supervised by the local Social Welfare and Development," she said.
The law also required the written consent of either the individual's spouse or nearest relative. Ladd-Taylor analyzes the limitations of the concept of "voluntary consent," but she argues that it did offer families a means to prevent some sterilization.
Under current legislation, patients detained under the act are allocated a "nearest relative", which can lead to distant or unknown relatives being called to make decisions about their care.