near-infrared radiation


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near-infrared radiation

(nîr′ĭn′frə-rĕd′)
n.
Electromagnetic radiation having the shortest wavelengths in the infrared region, often considered to be between approximately 0.75 and 2.5 micrometers. Also called near-red radiation.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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One layer of semiconductors--a mixture of mercury, cadmium, and telluride--records the near-infrared radiation, while a layer of silicon bonded to this material reads out the electronic signals.
Dust absorbs near-infrared radiation less readily, and a telescope operating at a near-infrared wavelength of 2 micrometers can see 10 times farther than a visible-light instrument.
(Only the color film was tested here.) Although these materials have very low visible-light transmittance levels, they transmit an unacceptably high level of near-infrared radiation. The black color film is a good example, having a shade number of 15 for visible light but transmitting almost 50 percent of the infrared radiation!
As recently as a decade ago, no one envisioned detecting near-infrared radiation from the face of Venus, To reach an orbiting telescope, for example, heat radiated from the surface must pass through dense layers of carbon dioxide - a gas that absorbs most nearinfrared light.
They made their estimate by comparing X-ray emissions from the galaxy's core with their own observations of dust-obscured, near-infrared radiation.
These halogen lamps generate near-infrared radiations, which provide browning and crisping effects in the baking process.