navicular


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Related to navicular: Navicular fossa

na·vic·u·lar

(nă-vik'yū-lăr), [TA]
Flattened, medially placed tarsal bone, concave on its posterior surface to accommodate the head of the talus, and convex on its anterior surface to articulate with the three cuneiform bones.
[L. navicularis, relating to shipping]

navicular

(nə-vĭk′yə-lər)
n.
1. A comma-shaped bone of the human wrist, located in the first row of carpals.
2. A concave bone of the human foot, located between the talus and the metatarsals. In both senses also called scaphoid.
adj.
Shaped like a boat; scaphoid.

navicular

adjective Referring or pertaining to the navicular bone.

noun The navicular bone itself.

scaph·oid

(skaf'oyd) [TA]
Boat-shaped; hollowed.
See also: scaphoid (bone)
Synonym(s): navicular.
[scapho- + G. eidos, resemblance]

navicular

The outermost of the wrist (CARPAL) bones on the thumb side in the nearest row. The bone is roughly boat-shaped, hence the name, which is derived from the Latin navis , a boat. Also known as SCAPHOID.
References in periodicals archive ?
The plantar pressure reduction was under navicular bone by 77% in control group.
After shooting (Canon Ixus 85 IS) the photographs of the weight-bearing and non weight-bearing foot's angle between the three marked points under non weight-bearing conditions (MLA angle), the change in this angle on the weight bearing foot (MLA deformation), and the drop of the navicular process under weight bearing conditions (navicular drop) were measured through a computer.
Five articles focused on risk factors, nine examined neuromuscular training, six addressed navicular drop, two studied anterior knee laxity, and one focused on male versus female biomechanical make-up differences.
He presented a systematic review and meta-analysis of 31 articles, mostly case series, which included 253 partial or complete tarsal navicular stress fractures, at the annual meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.
Torg of Temple University, Philadelphia, is credited with developing the non-weight-bearing cast immobilization regimen for navicular tarsal stress fractures a quarter century ago.
Accessory navicular (os tibiale externum, os naviculare secundarium)
Equine navicular syndrome, an incurable lameness of a horse's foot, is an example of this type of problem.
However, another possibility would be a stress fracture of one of the tarsal bones (the long foot bones that extend from the toe joints or metatarsals) called the navicular bone.
David McCarroll found VESWT particularly effective in the treatment of navicular disease, arthritic changes in the hock and saucer fractures.