natural dyes


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nat·u·ral dyes

dyes obtained from animals or plants; examples include carmine obtained from cochineal in the dried female insect Dactylopius coccus of Central America, and hematoxylin extracted from the bark of the logwood tree Haematoxylon campechianum in the Caribbean area.
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CBI is also promoting use of natural dyes, which will to a great extent reduce pollution in water bodies since the chemi cal dyes are released in to water ways and in the process environmentally harming the lakes and rivers.
"We have a wonderful line of eco-fabrics which are dyed in natural dyes. We have made a fantastic collection of jerseys.
Sunset teamed up with Juana Briones Elementary School in Palo Alto, California, to develop a fall garden, working with a team of parent volunteers and teachers to build raised beds, and then helping the schoolkids plant them with flowers and vegetables selected for making natural dyes.
"It's concerned with energy efficiency and the use of natural materials, such as non-toxic paints and natural dyes," she explains.
The rugs have a modern patchwork appearance with either striped or solid panels in rich colors from natural dyes.
The works of Yanawit Kunchaethong are rich with a unique technical mastery of using natural dyes as paint in his prints, a technique which he discovered by coincidence.
European trade further stimulated an interest in natural dyes, so that along with textiles there was active competition for these, particularly for indigo.
Gradually they started cultivating their fields to grow materials for natural dyes and fibres.
Natural dyes don't have the ill effects of synthetic dyes, such as pollution of the environment.
This includes anything from classes in upcycling and clothing alteration, natural dyes, and screen printing to hands-on learning from local artists and makers.
NATURAL DYES HAVE BEEN USED FOR centuries creating color from plants, insects, fungus, and minerals.

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