natural carcinogen

natural carcinogen

A substance normally present in foods that is carcinogenic when tested by mutagenic assays in rodents or bacteria (e.g., Ames’ test).  

It is unclear whether the 14 ppm of 5-8-methoxypsoralen present in parsley and parsnips, which is carcinogenic to rodents, or the 50–200 ppm of caffeic acid, present in apples, carrots, cherries and others, actually have a carcinogenic potential in humans.

natural carcinogen

A substance normally present in foods which is carcinogenic when tested by mutagenic assays in rodents or bacteria. See Ames' test, Toxicity testing.
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Found worldwide in air and soil, Aspergillus can infect corn, cotton, pistachios, almonds and other crops, and can produce aflatoxin, a natural carcinogen.
Growers of pistachios, almonds, corn, cotton, and some other crops know that it can infect their harvests and produce aflatoxin, a natural carcinogen.
In this study, rats were treated with RTA 403 (also known as CDDO-IM) and exposed to a potent natural carcinogen known as aflatoxin.
For example, a potato variety conventionally bred in the 1960s had near-lethal levels of solanine (a toxic alkaloid), and celery conventionally bred for pest resistance had a seven-fold increase in psoralen, a natural carcinogen and phototoxin, which caused skin rashes in agricultural workers.
One such agent is aflatoxin, adeadly natural carcinogen often carried by insects and strongly implicated in human liver cancer.
Low levels of aflatoxin -- the most potent natural carcinogen -- contaminate many foods.
The mold is of concern because it produces aflatoxin, a natural carcinogen.
Lieverse speculates smoke inhalation or other natural carcinogens may have caused this ancient cancer.
In her book "Communicating Health Risks to the Public: A Global Perspective,'' Dawn Hillier wrote of genetically modified foods: "The public views GM foods as riskier to health than natural carcinogens, because they believe they have no control over their exposure to the GM foods they consume.''
Consuming celery, mushrooms, roast beef, or beer would taint the blood with furocoumarin, hydrazine, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f] quinoline, and ethyl carbamate--all known natural carcinogens. And there would be arsenic as well.
The good news, according to ACSH scientists: these natural carcinogens pose no hazard to human health.
In 1996, the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, in a comprehensive report called Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet, concluded that levels of both synthetic and natural carcinogens are "so low that they are unlikely to pose an appreciable cancer risk." The National Cancer Institute reports that "increasing exposure to general environmental hazards seems unlikely to have had a major impact on the overall trends in cancer rates." "Pollution appears to account for less than 1 percent of cancer," concludes University of California biologist and cancer researcher Bruce Ames.

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