native language


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native language

The first language a person learns. It is usually the language he or she is most proficient in and uses with the greatest comfort, confidence, and precision.
Synonym: first language; mother tongue
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, teachers can encourage EL students to use their native languages for academic purposes in small collaborative groups; enlist parent support in developing native language literacy in the home; support EL student use of native language learning logs; and provide instructional materials, environmental print, and reading materials in the native languages of their EL students.
All else being equal, it is generally preferable to communicate with consumers using their own native language, as doing so should result in more emotional messages," the authors added.
JT: We have a model in the schools that phases out native language support, which is a tremendous tool for helping children learn.
He also predicted that the "accountability" facet under the new legislation would inhibit the use of Native language instruction (Crawford, J.
The idea behind the schools is to teach native language to children at an early age so that it is incorporated into their daily speech and--where feasible--their school instruction.
The present study examined the relationship among the major reading subskills that have been identified in previous research and examined whether the effect of such subskills differs depending on students' reading performance in English and their native language status (whether students are NE or L2 learners).
Ultimately, the college hopes to offer a program rigorous enough that students who pass the Native language class will be able to transfer the credits to a four-year university and have them count toward the language requirement for a bachelor's degree.
Reflecting on Ligaya's case, educators and parents need to realize that language-minority children must be able to speak their native language to understand their relatives, who can teach them about the culture of their native country.
Similarly, one can estimate the effect of instruction in two languages by comparing students whose transition to English was delayed (who were taught curriculum in their native language while receiving supplemental English instruction) with those who grew up in bilingual households but are English functional.
Anyone with net access should be able to "enconvert" text from a range of native languages into UNL, and then to "deconvert" from UNL to any other native language.
All languages are presumed to share these structural themes, which vary in significance from one tongue to another; the challenge for a fledgling communicator is to rank grammatical rules of thumb in a way that best plumbs the meaning of his or her native language.
Substitution of American English for native language was a testament to the power of the educational system which held that language diversity was undesirable (Kobrick, 1972).