nasofrontal


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Related to nasofrontal: nasofrontal vein

nasofrontal

 [na″zo-frun´tal]
pertaining to the nose and forehead or to the nasal and frontal bones.

na·so·fron·tal

(nā-zō-frŏn'tăl),
Relating to the nose and forehead, or to the nasal cavity and frontal sinuses.

nasofrontal

/na·so·fron·tal/ (-frun´t'l) pertaining to the nose and forehead or to nasal and frontal bones.

nasofrontal

(nā′zō-frŭn′təl)
adj.
Of or relating to the nasal and frontal bones.

na·so·fron·tal

(nā'zō-frŭn'tăl)
Relating to the nose and forehead, or to the nasal cavity and frontal sinuses.

na·so·fron·tal

(nā'zō-frŭn'tăl)
Relating to nose and forehead, or to nasal cavity and frontal sinuses.

nasofrontal

pertaining to the nasal and frontal bones.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nasofrontal angle is an angle between a line tangent to glabella through the nasion and a line drawn tangent to nasal dorsum.
32mm 32mm Nasolabial 106[degrees] 97[degrees] Nasofrontal 150[degrees] 143[degrees]
Among dicynodonts, longitudinal nasofrontal ridges are known in several genera (Lystrosaurus, Van Hoepen 1913; Cluver 1971; Pristerodon, Barry 1967; Kingoria, Kemp 1969).
Load transmission in the nasofrontal suture of the pig, Sus scrofa.
Nasion: The intersection of the internasal suture with the nasofrontal suture in the midsagittal plane.
those affecting the nasofrontal duct, posterior ethmoid sinus, or sphenoid sinus) to be acceptable candidates for an endoscopic approach.
A second taxonomic determination was made then on these individuals, on the basis of qualitative cranial characters described by Galliari and Pardinas (2000): nasals flat, nasofrontal suture with respect to the orbital process, frontal edges, interorbital constriction, free upper border of zygomatic plate, shape of the mesopterygoid fossa, and direction of the coronoid process in relation to articular process and develop of the coronoid process.
The endoscopic examination revealed that the posterior table was intact and that the nasofrontal duct appeared to be patent.
Weber et al suggest that successful obliteration of the frontal sinus requires meticulous removal of the frontal sinus mucosa, removal of the inner cortex of the sinus wall, and permanent occlusion of the nasofrontal duct.
Next, the left frontal sinus was brightly illuminated with the flexible nasopharyngoscope at the level of the nasofrontal duct (figure 2).
This was because of the focal nature of many of the reported cases and the remoteness of the involved areas from the nasofrontal recess.
This spectrum includes anomalies that are related to the nasal cavity, nasofrontal region, nasolacrimal apparatus, and craniofacial syndromes.