nascent

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nascent

 [nas´ent, na´sent]
1. being born; just coming into existence.
2. just liberated from a chemical combination, and hence more reactive because uncombined.

nas·cent

(nas'ent, nā'sent),
1. Beginning; being born or produced.
2. Denoting the state of a chemical element at the moment it is set free from one of its compounds.
[L. nascor, pres. p. nascens, to be born]

nas·cent

(nā'sĕnt)
1. Beginning; being born or produced.
2. Denoting the state of a chemical element at the moment it is set free from one of its compounds.
[L. nascor, pres. p. nascens, to be born]

nas·cent

(nā'sĕnt)
1. Beginning; being born or produced.
2. Denoting the state of a chemical element at the moment it is set free from one of its compounds.
[L. nascor, pres. p. nascens, to be born]
References in periodicals archive ?
"Since the Psychedelic nature was an attack on established academics and authority, the Psychedelic Culture, which, from its nascence had a strong connection with generic and popular music, broadened its horizons to an entire new popular culture in a mixture of art and music" (Takumi, 2001: 27).
Although still in its nascence, Adebiyi's WeCyclers triumphed over two other finalists in her category, after she had made the final 19 global candidates from a pool of over 1,000 applicants for 2013.
It's a staggering number, and somehow I doubt that many more future Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniaks were working on PCs in the nascence of that industry.
Begun after a recovery project that Middlebrook worked on in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, and inspired by the archipelago city of Stockholm (where the drawing had its nascence), "A Fresh Start" demands that the viewer consider the repercussions of human actions upon the environment.
The introduction of new technological capabilities will have as fundamental a part to play now as did the emergence of heavy engineering in the mid-20th century and the nascence of microelectronics and IT after the 1970s.
Although global market conditions and the political environment of Peru remain the largest explanations for this, two factors, both related to the nascence of Latin American finance, have also played a role in the success of those listed in Peru.
African Americans, having endured the blessing and curse of freedom, as ushered in by emancipation and Reconstruction's failure, continued to develop within their own unique American nascence. Caught within the throes of America's national dysfunction and their own desire to cultivate a sound and reputable identity, black folk found themselves drowning, metaphorically and literally, in the blood of America's racial and social nadir.
(242.) See Jean Armour Polly, Birth of a Metaphor--The Nascence of Surfing the Internet, Netmom.com (Mar.
(3) If her Victorian-era prose sets Costello apart as especially self-assured and intellectually vivacious, as Lyle claims, then these qualities have their nascence in Costello's Regency-era debut volume, The Maid of the Cyprus Isle (1815), or, more precisely, in a triptych of topical companion poems--"On Reading the Account of the Battle of Waterloo," "Verses, on the Picture of the King of Rome, Holding Violets," and "Napoleon, on his Residence in St.
Owing to its relative nascence, this result is perhaps not surprising.
This fate of the primary text provides an opportunity for the nascence of the secondary text, recreating and, effectively, replacing the primary text.