nascent

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Related to nascence: mouch, Moile

nascent

 [nas´ent, na´sent]
1. being born; just coming into existence.
2. just liberated from a chemical combination, and hence more reactive because uncombined.

nas·cent

(nas'ent, nā'sent),
1. Beginning; being born or produced.
2. Denoting the state of a chemical element at the moment it is set free from one of its compounds.
[L. nascor, pres. p. nascens, to be born]

nascent

/nas·cent/ (nas´ent) (na´sent)
1. being born; just coming into existence.
2. just liberated from a chemical combination, and hence more reactive because uncombined.

nascent

[nas′ənt, nā′sənt]
Etymology: L, nasci, to be born
1 just born; beginning to exist; incipient.
2 (in chemistry) pertaining to any substance liberated during a chemical reaction that, because of its uncombined state, is more reactive.

nas·cent

(nā'sĕnt)
1. Beginning; being born or produced.
2. Denoting the state of a chemical element at the moment it is set free from one of its compounds.
[L. nascor, pres. p. nascens, to be born]

nas·cent

(nā'sĕnt)
1. Beginning; being born or produced.
2. Denoting the state of a chemical element at the moment it is set free from one of its compounds.
[L. nascor, pres. p. nascens, to be born]

nascent (nas´ənt, nā´sənt),

adj literal meaning: recently born. Also, just released from chemical combination.

nascent

1. being born; just coming into existence.
2. just liberated from a chemical reaction, and hence more reactive.

nascent DNA
References in periodicals archive ?
This finding suggests that location makes a difference in the resource assembly process of nascent entrepreneurs and supports a more general theory of nascence in which entrepreneurial start-ups are embedded in social structures that influence the resource assembly process (Aldrich & Martinez, 2001; Baum & Haveman, 1997; Jack & Anderson, 2002).
The platform's nascence, and the recent explosion of its' use since February 2009, leaves many open questions as to its' impact upon privacy and transparency.
As he moves toward the point where he eventually finds himself "ready, with the merest encouragement, to destroy his life," he raises questions of the nature of art, aging and the world's collective worship of nascence, and beauty.
19) Drug testing had its nascence in the military, several years prior to President Reagan's well-known declaration of a War on Drugs.
Sotheby's Hong Kong is pleased to announce the sale of an important private collection of contemporary Chinese Art on 3 April: The Ullens Collection - The Nascence of Avant Garde China, offering 106 masterpieces from the legendary Collection, which are expected to bring a total of HK$100 million to HK$130 million / US$12.
Again, an adaptation-focused logic may be only poorly suited to understanding the nascence of routines in radically different environments.
This area of research is in its nascence in therapeutic recreation, and as such, multiple lines of inquiry are possible.
What we begin to see what Looking Backward and its sequels do not see--is an epistemological shift, one perhaps only in its nascence but which, within a few years, would not only produce some of the most radical experiments in literature and art but also disrupt the very notions of value and truth upon which progressive political movements such as Bellamy's nationalism were founded.
The class was then invited to dialogue about the impact culture has on theory nascence and development.
Given the nascence of the amended Indian Patent Act, new patent decisions by Indian courts can have a dramatic precedential effect on how it is applied.
Considering women disproportionately bear the brunt of obesity discrimination, the idea that obesity discrimination is really gender discrimination--an idea casually set-aside during the nascence of the obesity debate (170)--should be reconsidered.