nasal flaring

nasal flaring

Internal medicine An ↑ in nostril size with breathing, a classic sign of severe asthma. See Asthma.

nasal flaring

Intermittent outward movement of the nostrils with each inspiratory effort; indicates an increase in the work of breathing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with evidence of respiratory compromise (tachypnea, retractions, and/or nasal flaring) shortly after delivery, a persistent oxygen requirement and radiographic findings of RDS received surfactant in both groups.
Other symptoms include nasal flaring, use of accessory muscles and grunting respirations.
Multivariable predictors included oxygen saturation <90 percent, nasal flaring and/or grunting, apnea, retractions, age ≤2 months, dehydration, and poor feeding (odds ratios, 8.9, 3.8, 3.0, 3.0, 2.1, 2.1, and 1.9, respectively).
The ED physical exam noted a newborn who appeared mildly dehydrated, with moderate distress as evidenced by retractions, tachypnea, and nasal flaring. There was no rhinorrhea and nasal congestion, and the lungs were clear to auscultation without any wheezing, rhonchi, or rales.
Because of respiratory distress, manifested by nasal flaring, intercostal, subcostal and suprasternal retractions, a respiratory rate of 80 breaths per minute and cyanosis, heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy was used in our intensive care unit to reduce the work of breathing.
In terms of signs and symptoms, 125(60.9%) had grunting, 205(100%) had subcostal retractions and nasal flaring, and 81(40%) had cyanosis.
Patients CU134 and CU171 had suprasternal and subcostal retraction, and patient CU171 had signs of nasal flaring and inspiratory stridor (he has an underlying double aortic arch).
* Did the authors review other estimates of the degree of clinical respiratory distress, such as nasal flaring, retractions, or cyanosis?
There can also be abnormal breathing patterns, chest pains, nasal flaring and the temporary suspension of breathing, all of which are serious symptoms.
Signs and symptoms are typically rhinitis, tachypnea, wheezing, coughing, crackles, retractions, and/or nasal flaring. At the time of diagnosis, the patient should be assessed for hydration and specific risk factors for severe disease.
Even though the physical exam reveals rales, nasal flaring and retractions, Sara does not have a fever, nasal discharge, or a cough that is worsening.
Other clinical manifestations include hoarseness, restlessness, rapid ventilatory rate, use of accessory muscles of ventilation, intercostal and suprasternal retractions, and nasal flaring. In more severe cases the child will appear cyanotic because of marked desaturation.