narcotize

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narcotize

 [nahr´ko-tīz]
to put under the influence of a narcotic.

narcotize

(när′kə-tīz′)
tr.v. narco·tized, narco·tizing, narco·tizes
1. To place under the influence of a narcotic.
2. To put to sleep; lull.
3. To dull; deaden.

nar′co·ti·za′tion (-tĭ-zā′shən) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, relativism, even in its extreme formulations, rarely results in narcotizing all claims to knowledge but only in qualifying the range of applicability of such claims.
Predictably, few if any of the journalists who dutifully recorded the heady numbers seemed inclined to remark on the antidemocratic nature of this latest consolidation, which like those before it leaves the power to promulgate ideas and shape politics in the hands of a decreasing number of corporate potentates who are narcotizing a growing international audience with the Gospel According to Beavis and Butt-Head.
every movement even distantly endangering the rule of the actually dominating class." This "narcotizing of his soul" by "mass suggestion" makes the unsuspecting citizen believe that war against whatever capital designates as the enemy is an act of great love of country.
This idea has popped up now and then, first in Lazarsfeld and Merton's "narcotizing," later in Gerbner and Gross' "heavy viewers" trapped inside television reality, and in Putnam, Iyengar, Boltanski, and others who lament this seeming impotence.
There were several dysfunctions like the narcotizing one--the population is politically apathetic and inert because information works like a narcotic destroying social action and contributing to social conformism (LAZARSFELD and MERTON, 1948)--or the visual culture (SARTORI, 1998) that simplifies reality and appeals to feelings.
In taking his title from the lexicon of science, he makes clear that he seeks to engage the techno-capitalist world machine using its own language, its own tools, and its own methods of operation--yet without succumbing to the narcotizing fetishism of technophilia.
More recently toxins and narcotizing agents have been described from the hypobranchial gland such as serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), murexine (urocanylcholine), choline ester and biogenic amines (Erspamer 1946, 1952; Erspamer & Benati 1953, Whittaker 1960, Malaszkiewicz 1967, Huang & Mir 1971, Andrews et al.
Not just the Vietnam War and Watergate and the rise of urban violence and the narcotizing effects of television ...