narcotic addict

narcotic addict

One who has become physiologically or psychologically dependent upon narcotics.
See: drug addiction
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1937, Commissioner Henry Anslinger, the first commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics ("FBN"), testifying before Congress stated, "the major criminal in the United States is the drug addict; that of all the offenses committed against the laws of this country, the narcotic addict is the most frequent offender." (4) Criminalizing the drug addict and drug-involved behavior increased in 1971 when President Richard Nixon declared a "War on Drugs." (5) Subsequently, the Reagan era saw the passage of The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986, which strengthened prosecution and penalties for the drug user.
In response to the increasing concern over addiction to methadone, Congress enacted the Narcotic Addict Treatment Act of 1974, once again seeking to limit the public's access to opioid medications--this time, Methadone--by placing strict limits on practitioners' ability to prescribe Methadone to treat opioid addiction.
[section] 823(g) (2012) (discussing the restrictions placed on practitioners treating narcotic addicts).
Some reports also suggest that the killer teenage boy is a junkie - a narcotic addict, who had lost the sense to wit when shooting his own family members dead.
Rehabilitation and the narcotic addict: Results of a comparative methadone withdrawal program.
Management of the narcotic addict. British Columbia Medical J 1963;5(10):412-14.
For the first time since the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970 and the Narcotic Addict Treatment Act of 1974 were enacted, methadone clinics will be required to become accredited as health care facilities.
In California, for instance, a person can either be a narcotic addict or only in imminent danger of addiction and in need of Care, supervision, and treatment.
The use of ascorbic acid and mineral supplements in the detoxification of narcotic addicts. J Orthomolec Psychiatry.
He called for making functional the hospital for the rehabilitation of narcotic addicts.
I find it interesting that while Sullum quotes a sociologist who wrote that "narcotic addicts tend to 'mature out' of the habit in their 30s," every example of a "successful addict" (save one) in the article was 40 or older.
In the early 1960S, based on records kept by the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, sociologist Charles Winick concluded that narcotic addicts tend to "mature out" of the habit in their 30S.