narcissism

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Related to narcissistic: sociopath

narcissism

 [nahr´sĭ-sizm]
dominant interest in oneself; self-love. adj., adj narcissis´tic.
primary narcissism that occurring in the early infantile phase of object relationship development, when the child has not differentiated himself from the outside world and regards all sources of pleasure as originating within himself.
secondary narcissism that in which the libido, once attached to external love objects, is redirected back to the self.

nar·cis·sism

(nar'sis-izm, nar'si-sizm),
1. A state in which one interprets and regards everything in relation to oneself and not to other people or things.
See also: autoeroticism.
2. Self-love, which may include sexual attraction toward oneself.
See also: autoeroticism. Compare: autosynnoia.
Synonym(s): self-love
[Narkissos, G. myth. char.]

narcissism

(när′sĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. Excessive preoccupation with or admiration of oneself.
2. A personality disorder characterized by an exaggerated sense of self-importance, need for admiration, and lack of empathy. Also called narcissistic personality disorder.
3. Pleasure derived from contemplation or admiration of one's own body or self, considered in psychoanalytic theory to be a fixation on or a regression to an infantile stage of development.

nar′cis·sist n.
nar′cis·sis′tic adj.
nar′cis·sis′ti·cal·ly adv.

narcissism

A term with a wide range of meanings, most or all of which include an obsessive focus on oneself and one’s needs and wants, to the virtual exclusion of other people.

nar·cis·sism

(nahr'si-sizm)
1. Sexual attraction toward one's own person.
2. A state in which the person interprets and regards everything in relation to himself or herself and not to other people or things.
Synonym(s): self-love.
[Narkissos, G. myth. char.]

narcissism

Possession of an exaggerated and exhibitionistic need for admiration and praise and an overweening conviction of one's own merits and attractiveness. Narcissus, a character in Greek mythology, was a youth who fell in love with his own reflection in a pond.

Narcissus,

Greek mythological youth who refused all offers of love.
narcissism - self-love, which may include sexual attraction toward oneself. Synonym(s): self-love

nar·cis·sism

(nahr'si-sizm)
1. State in which one interprets everything in relation to oneself and not to other people or things.
2. Self-love, which may include sexual attraction to oneself.
[Narkissos, G. myth. char.]

Patient discussion about narcissism

Q. Is narcissism misdiagnosed as bipolar disorder or autism? Is narcissism misdiagnosed as bipolar disorder or autism? It would seem to me that Bipolar and some forms of Autism are equally likely to be misdiagnosed as NPD.

A. well...what do you know...i didn't even know there's a connection between the two...the seeing your question made me wanna check it up. and i found this article:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9661104

it says that there are narcissistic behavior amongst bipolar patients.

More discussions about narcissism
References in periodicals archive ?
Davies aims to outline the details and warning signs of narcissistic abuse and other manipulative behaviours to help readers be able to more easily identify this.
They found that the students reacted negatively to their age group being labelled as narcissistic and entitled, and they reacted with a similar degree of negativity to other undesirable labels, such as oversensitivity.
The main reason why university students were included in the study is that there are empirical findings indicating increased narcissistic tendencies among university students (4).
However, four personality disorders were investigated in this research including histrionic, antisocial, narcissistic and borderline personality disorder.
Per the above analysis, we therefore formed the following hypothesis: Hypothesis 2: Organizational identification will mediate the relationship between narcissistic leadership and employees' knowledge sharing.
Instead of working in the patient's narcissistic personality presentation, these programs either engage in clinical pandering or lose the patient through culturally insensitive interventions.
Overconfidence and rebelliousness, both considered narcissistic traits, have been associated with procrastination in undergraduate college students.11 The arguable notion that medical professionals are narcissistic,12 and the high prevalence of procrastination among medical students13 suggest a possible association between the two psychological characteristics.
However, maladaptive schemas partially mediated between paternal permissive parenting style and narcissistic personality disorder because regression weights fell from 0.12 to 0.09.
According to Brindusa Orasanu, the evolution of the concept of projective identification highlights an investment displacement of the psychoanalytic theory towards the external object and a diffusion of the subjectivity towards the external world of the patient's psychic reality--as a possible "narcissistic restoration" of the external object represented by the analyst in the clinic.
But it's true a narcissistic parent is one who feels threatened by a child's growing independence and, thus, may do all he/she can to keep the child under control.
Empirical researches on narcissistic personality have revealed that people differ in two independent dimensions of narcissism, i.e., grandiosity and vulnerability.
The narcissism score for each CEO is the ratio of first person singular pronouns to total first person pronouns used in their speech, a trait that was first identified in 1988 as being correlated with narcissistic personalities and replicated in subsequent research.