nanotechnology

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nanotechnology

(nă″nō-tĕk-nŏl′ŏ-jē) [L. nanus, dwarf, + Gr. technē, art, + logos, word, reason]
The scientific study and engineering of chemical or biological objects measuring between 1 and 1000 nanometers. Objects this small are about the size of atoms or small molecules. “Wet” nanotechnology is the manipulation of organic or biological compounds in solution. “Dry” nanotechnology is the engineering of objects on silicon or carbon surfaces, such as those used in computing.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

nanotechnology

The application of the science of manipulation at an atomic level. The practical applications of the ability to move single atoms so as to construct molecules, materials, structures and even functioning machines at an atomic level. Nanotechnology is currently at a germinal stage but is expected to have extensive applications in medicine. See also MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Since, according to the latest theories, memory is data storage in synopses, and the understanding of synopses is the real need of neuroscience at the moment, the researchers introduced the abilities of nanotechnology in this field, and they opened the new path to neuroscientists in order to cooperate with nanotechnologists. In other words, synopses send brain messages and save data through very tiny materials called neuro-carriers.
The conference provided a wonderful opportunity and discussion forum largely attended clinicians, microbiologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, biologists, chemists, pharmacists, natural polymer scientists, biomaterial scientists and nanotechnologists on the conference.
Within STEM careers, there are opportunities for biophysicists, nanotechnologists, and geoengineers, and the growing trend in research and industry to tackle complex problems in interdisciplinary teams requires an ability to think and work beyond one's area of expertise.
Nanotechnologists examine extremely small functional structures (normally biological), for instance membranes, enzymes and other cellular components ('wet nanotechnology') and try, furthermore, to experimentally create these structures, using, for instance, semi-conductors ('dry nanotechnology') or to simulate their properties on computers ('computational nanotechnology').
A team of nanotechnologists in Japan has developed a viscoelastic material that has an operational range more than three times that of silicone rubber.
Nanotechnologists draw on draw on fields such as materials science, chemistry, protein engineering, biotechnology, and systems engineering.
The collaboration of nanotechnologists, engineers, cell biologists, physicists, mathematicians, physicians, and others has already resulted in fascinating knowledge, some of which is ready to be applied to otolaryngologic disorders.
Nanotechnologists have become increasingly interested in the highly tunable surface properties that ultrathin nanofilms can confer to solid objects, without affecting the behavior of the bulk material.
Wales may not be a large nation but, as the nanotechnologists have proven, small is the new big.
The ability to customize DNA's structural and binding traits will give nanotechnologists even more control, Romesberg says.
"They have fascinatedman fromthe ancient Egyptians, through Leonardo Da Vinci in the Renaissance period to the nanotechnologists of today."
Nanotechnologists are developing everything from sugar-cube-sized computers to longer-lasting tennis balls.