naltrexone


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

naltrexone

 [nal-trek´sōn]
an opioid antagonist used as the hydrochloride salt in treatment of opioid or alcohol abuse.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

nal·trex·one

(nal-treks'ōn),
An orally active narcotic antagonist; devoid of pharmacologic action when administered in the absence of narcotics.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

naltrexone

(năl-trĕk′sōn)
n.
A synthetic opioid antagonist, C20H23NO4, used in its hydrochloride form to treat addiction to alcohol and to opioid drugs such as heroin.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

naltrexone

Substance abuse An opioid antagonist used to manage opiate, alcohol and other abuse substances; naltrexone binds to endorphin receptors, preventing endophin receptor binding, reducing the craving for abuse substances. See Cocaine. Cf Antabuse.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

naltrexone

A narcotic antagonist used as a maintenance therapy in former narcotic addicts. A brand name is Nalorex.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

nal·trex·one

(nal-treks'ōn)
Orally active narcotic antagonist; devoid of pharmacologic action when administered in absence of narcotics.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Extended-release injectable naltrexone is adminstered in 380mg doses every four weeks and produces a reduction in heavy drinking days of 25%, and in the alcohol consumed on the days the patient drinks again.
During detoxification, substitute opioids were given to both groups along with other medication and gradually tapered off and stopped after 1-2 weeks so that after 2 weeks all patients were started on Naltrexone 50mg/day.
Following oral administration, naltrexone undergoes rapid and nearly complete absorption with approximately 96% of the dose absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract.
Twenty-two were placebo-controlled for acamprosate (1000-3000 mg/d), 44 for naltrexone (50 mg/d oral, 100 mg/d oral, or injectable) and 4 compared the 2 drugs.
"Naltrexone treatment, in any form, is also very different from Methadone treatment in that Naltrexone is not addictive," said (http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=BICX) BioCorRx, Inc.
It found that even though extended-release Naltrexone is expensive - about $1,100 a month - total health care costs were generally lower for patients taking it, compared to those using other alcohol and drug-dependence treatments.
With research governance ethics approval, we searched the operating theatre management system database to identify patients who had presented for removal of naltrexone implants between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2008.
Extended-release naltrexone, a formulation that only requires a monthly injection, holds the potential to minimize problems with medication adherence.
Data on buprenorphine and oral naltrexone prescribing are taken from the Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Event Standard Analytic File (2010-2015).
Of the 108 patients, 82 (76%) remained on naltrexone until delivery; in these pregnancies, there were no cases of NAS.
"This is the first prospective study and largest to date on the use of naltrexone in pregnancy," Dr.