mythopoiesis


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mythopoiesis

The internal fabrication of mythic events or false memories that may subsequently be revealed or acted out in multiple personalities, trances, ‘demonic possession’, seemingly psychic phenomena or conviction of their reality.
References in periodicals archive ?
(12) And as to the relationship between mythology and philosophy, Aristotle considered the latter to be a form of mythopoiesis, and Greek philosophy as a whole (beginning with the post-Socratics such as Plato or Plotinus) were completely immersed in a world permeated by myth: What, for example, is the psyche (soul) in Plato but a myth of Hindustani origin, which cannot be demonstrated by means of empirical evidence (a myth which is handed down all the way to Kant)?
For example, in a published letter to one of your readers WM4 writes, "We want to reconstruct a mythopoiesis for us, and not take one on loan from the generations that have come before us." Likewise, in a 2002 essay you wrote: "We believe that people are expressing a need for new foundational myths.
Harris converge in the view that, as his artistic vision evolved, Baraka sought and indeed may have succeeded in creating an Orphic poetry that bridges the gap between a repressed origin and a present vision so as to create a melopoiesis that is at the same time a mythopoiesis, a mythopoiesis that at the same time speaks directly and in unadorned language to reality: "By restructuring white stereotypes, Baraka is trying to expose the hidden reality of black self-images and to create new images--postwhite--no longer dependent on white imagery and capable of communicating black realities without a mask" (Harris 93).
Faithfully following the meanders of the game of text-and-pretext that Marcel Benabou proposes, the reader will confirm that mythopoiesis is indeed centrally at issue in Ecrire sur Tamara.
In another characterization of Freudian myth, Graham Frankland (2000, 4) has explained how it was not "something at the opposite pole from any privileged 'reality', but rather a self-consciously fictional narrative, often dealing with pseudo-historical origins, but whose significance is actually structural." Under this description, Ovidian and psychoanalytic mythopoiesis share an etiological aspect in the sense that they can both be read as providing explanations for the complex and diverse processes of human engendering and desiring.