myrrh


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myrrh

(mer),
A gum resin from Commiphora molmol and C. abyssinica (family Burseraceae) and other species of C., a shrub of Arabia and eastern Africa; used as an astringent, tonic, and stimulant, and locally for diseases of the oral cavity and in mouthwashes; thought to have been used in ancient Egyptian medicine and embalming.
[G. myrrha]

myrrh

(mur) the oleo-gum-resin obtained from species of Commiphora; applied topically in mild inflammations of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa.

myrrh 1

(mûr)
n.
An aromatic gum resin obtained from several trees and shrubs of the genus Commiphora of northeastern Africa and Arabia, used in perfume, incense, and medicinal preparations.

myrrh 2

(mûr)
n.
See sweet cicely.

myrrh

Herbal medicine
A flowering plant that contains volatile oils (cinamaldehyde, cuminaldehyde, eugenol, heerabolene, limonene, pinene and others), resin and gum; it is antifungal, antiseptic, astringent, cardiotonic and expectorant. Myrrh has been used as a mouthwash for sore throats and laryngitis; topically for athlete’s foot, wounds and as a mosquito repellent; and internally for asthma, colds, coughs, chest congestion and sinusitis. Some data suggest that myrrh may lower cholesterol and reduce blood clot formation.
 
Toxicity
Myrrh should not be used in pregnancy or in those with renal failure.

myrrh

(mĕr)
A gum resin from Commiphora molmol and C. abyssinica (family Burseraceae) and other species, used as an astringent, tonic, and stimulant, and locally for diseases of the oral cavity and in mouthwashes; thought to have been used in ancient Egyptian medicine and embalming.
[G. myrrha]

myrrh

a resin derived from plants of the genus Commiophora.

myrrh (murˑ),

n Latin name:
Commiphora molmol; parts used: gum, oil, resin; uses: antipyretic, anticancer, upper respiratory conditions, gum disease, mouth and leg ulcers, inflamed stomach, wounds, hemorrhoids; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, fever, tachycardia, uterine bleeding, antidiabetic medications. Also called
African myrrh, Arabian myrrh, bal, bol, bola, gum myrrh, heerabol, Somali myrrh, or
Yemen myrrh.

myrrh

(mĕr)
Gum resin used as an astringent, tonic, and stimulant, and locally for diseases of oral cavity and in mouthwashes.
[G. myrrha]
References in periodicals archive ?
They brought baby food and clothing, not gold, frankincense and myrrh and on arrival they immediately helped out by cleaning up the stable.
From the days of Moses, to the time of Christ and since to the twentieth century, Myrrh has proven over again to be one of the finest anti-bacterial and anti-viral agents placed on earth," says the Science of Herbal Medicine.
Shanon Hoffman, Publisher & Owner at Healing Lifestyles & Spas, says: "MuLondon Organic Marigold, Frankincense & Myrrh Moisturiser is always a staple in the office.
Myrrh and frankincense were some of the ancient world's most coveted commodities, linking modern-day Yemen into a global network of trade that reached as far as China.
Namibian myrrh has been sustainably harvested for a long period in Namibia's northwest by the Himba people.
Hussein Shehadeh "And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary, his mother, and fell down and worshipped Him: And when they had opened their treasures, they presented Him with gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh.
cinnamon and cloves with allspice and myrrh, unwound
Q&A Millie Jamieson, seven, from North Shields, North Tyneside, asked: On learning about the Nativity, I know the three wise men gave gold, frankincense and myrrh to baby Jesus, but what exactly is frankincense and myrrh?
BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND is Propolis Ampersand Myrrh Gingermint Baking Soda toothpaste from Tom's of Maine.
It is one of the brand's best sellers and contains moisturising shea butter along with mulberry extract to revitalise ageing skin and myrrh extract for strong nails.