myrmecia


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Related to myrmecia: bulldog ant, bull ants

Myrmecia

(mir-mē'shē-ă),
A genus of stinging ants of Australia.

myr·me·ci·a

(mĭr-mē'shē-ă),
A form of viral wart in which the lesion has a domed surface (that is, an ant hill configuration) and is associated with pale staining intranuclear and amphophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in the epidermal cells.
Synonym(s): bull ant
[G. murmex, ant]

myr·me·ci·a

(mir-mē'shē-ă)
A form of viral wart in which the lesion has a domed surface (i.e., an anthill configuration).
[G. murmex, ant]

myrmecia

(mŭr-mē′shē-ă) [Gr. myrmex, ant]
A dome-shaped wart.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Taylor, "Ants with Attitude: Australian Jack-jumpers of the Myrmecia pilosula specie complex, with descriptions of four new species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Myrmeciinae)," Zootaxa, vol.
Crozier, "Myrmecia pilosula, an ant with only one pair of chromosomes," Science, vol.
Taylor, "Chromosomal polymorphisms involving telomere fusion, centromeric inactivation and centromere shift in the ant Myrmecia (pilosula) n=1," Chromosoma, vol.
Caption: Figure 1: Myrmecia impaternata, queen, workers, larvae, and a pupal cocoon in a laboratory observation nest (RWT, CDB).
Caption: Figure 2: Comparison of karyotypes of Myrmecia banksi (a, a'), M.
In Nothomyrmecia (and Myrmecia pyriformis [17]) visual navigation across the ground between nest and host tree in dusk and dawn light is essentially crepuscular, and vision is probably less important than geotaxis for navigation on host trees during full darkness [15].
Exchange of food between workers, workers and queen, or adults and larvae by trophallaxis or as trophic eggs (as in Myrmecia [21, 22]) was not observed in Nothomyrmecia by Jaisson et al.
Peeters, "Worker polymorphism and nest structure in Myrmecia brevinoda Forel (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)," Journal of the Australian Entomological Society, vol.
Peeters, "Caste specialization and differentiation in reproductive potential in the phylogenetically primitive ant Myrmecia gulosaInsectes Sociaux, vol.
In the present study, we found the genera Cephalotes (57%) and Solenopsis (50%) to have particularly high infection rates, Tetraponera (33.3%) and Polyrhachis (25.0%) with intermediate rates, Crematogaster (16.7%) and Pseudomyrmex (13.9%) with rather low rates, and no infections in the samples of Camponotus, Myrmecia, Myrmecocystus, Oecophylla, and Paraponera included here.
No infection was detected in Crematogaster, Myrmecia, Myrmecocystus, and Oecophylla (Table 1).
In contrast, Asaia-related symbionts were lacking in Camponotus, Crematogaster, Myrmecia, Myrmecocystus, Polyrhachis, Oecophylla, and Solenopsis.