myostatin


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MSTN

A gene on chromosome 2q32.2 that encodes myostatin, a member of the bone morphogenetic protein family, which regulates cell growth and differentiation in both embryonic and adult bone and cartilage. Myostatin appears to downregulate skeletal muscle growth.

myostatin

(mī′ō-stāt′ĭn)
A growth-regulating protein that limits the size of muscles by inhibiting excessive growth.
References in periodicals archive ?
As for myostatin knockdown/knockout effects on fiber type of skeletal muscle, the absence of myostatin reported to lead to an overall faster and more glycolytic muscle phenotype (Girgenrath et al., 2005; Magee et al., 2006).
No significant differences in the abundance of myostatin transcripts were found in cold and heat stressed embryos, irrespective of timing exposure analysed (p > 0.05) (Figure 1).
Scholar Rock continues to evaluate multiple potential opportunities for which SRK-015 could offer clinical benefit and is assessing additional potential clinical settings in which the selective inhibition of the activation of myostatin may offer therapeutic benefit.
On the other hand, they have also pointed out that increased adjustment of the Myostatin produced through exercise training in elders remains high for a longer length of time; showing that for having a better hypertrophy, the elderly requires longer recovery times between their exercise sessions.
Analysis of the effects of androgens and training on myostatin propeptide and follistatin concentrations in blood and skeletal muscle using highly sensitive Immuno PCR.
Its main function is the negative regulation of the muscle mass [30], which means high level of myostatin, less muscle mass.
Yamamoto, "Myostatin modulates adipogenesis to generate adipocytes with favorable metabolic effects," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
Gonzalez-Cadavid, Myostatin inhibits cell proliferation and protein synthesis in C2C12 muscle cells, Am.
This finding may be explained by the physiological limit of the tissue or animal, which takes into account the tissue adaptation limit regulated by myostatin, thus preventing hypertrophy occurring in an uncontrolled manner (Yamada et al., 2012).
Many studies have focused on searching for polymorphisms in equine genes among different breeds and utility types; myostatin (MSTN), alpha amylases (AMY1, AMY2) and actin alpha 1 (ACTA1) genes may serve as good examples (Baron et al.
These proteins are activated in response to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-[beta]), activin, and myostatin (figure 2).