myofibromatosis

my·o·fi·bro·ma·to·sis

(mī'yō-fī'brō-ma-tō'sis),
Solitary or multiple tumors of muscle and fibrous tissue, or tumors composed by myofibroblasts.
[myo- + L. fibra, fiber, + G. suffix, -ōma, tumor, + suffix -osis, condition]

myofibromatosis

See Infantile myofibromatosis.

my·o·fi·bro·ma·to·sis

(mīō-fībrō-mă-tōsis)
Solitary or multiple tumors of muscle and fibrous tissue, or tumors composed by myofibroblasts.
[myo- + L. fibra, fiber, + G. suffix, -ōma, tumor, + suffix -osis, condition]
References in periodicals archive ?
Myofibroma occurs commonly in the dermis or subcutis of the head and neck, trunk, and extremities, and can be solitary or multicentric (myofibromatosis).
Infantile myofibromatosis (IM) is the most common fibrous tumor in infants and children under the age of two.
The differential diagnosis includes spindle cell-shaped neoplasms such as benign and malignant tumors of the nerve sheaths, myofibroblastic tumors (myofibromatosis, fibromatosis, and myofibroblastic sarcoma), synovial sarcoma, and fibrosarcoma.
Congenital myofibromatosis with pulmonary manifestations.
Myofibromatosis in adults, glomangiopericytoma, and myopericytoma: A spectrum of tumors showing perivascular myoid differentiation.
The histopathologic differentiation between aggressive fibromatosis and other closely related spindle cell lesions like fibrosarcoma, neurofibroma, nodular fascitis, fibrous histiocytoma and infantile myofibromatosis is a challenge to the pathologist as it requires expertise to differentiate the finer details.
In this case, firm fibrotic lesions to consider include myofibroma, irritation fibroma, neurofibroma, angiofibroma, myofibromatosis, and fibrotic pyogenic granuloma.
Infantile myofibromatosis: a nontraumatic cause of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.
(1,2) Although an estimated 90% of all cases occur in the first 2 years of life, (3) myofibromas can arise in patients of any age and, accordingly, the condition is broadly divided into infantile (juvenile) myofibromatosis and adult myofibromatosis.
The differential diagnoses of intraparotid schwannoma should comprise the large diagnostic spectrum in which spindle cells are involved such as neurofibrome, fibroblastic/myofibroblastic tumors, most frequently nodular fasciitis, and fibromatosis with an infrequent myofibromatosis, fibroma, haemangiopericytoma, solitary fibrous tumor or inflammatory pseudotumor (inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor).
These features suggest a broader differential diagnostic list that includes reactive changes or spindle cell lesions, such as fibrosing pyogenic granuloma, infantile myofibromatosis, rhabdomyoma, rhabdomyomatous choristoma, or juvenile xanthogranuloma.