myofascial pain syndrome


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Related to myofascial pain syndrome: Myofascial Release

myofascial pain syndrome

A chronic, nonprogressive, nondegenerative and non-inflammatory musculoskeletal pain syndrome, which is characterised by local or referred pain evoked at multiple trigger points and accompanied by stiffness, weakness, “knot formation”, and decreased range of motion in precise, specific patterns.
 
Clinical findings
Generalised pain—head, neck, chest, joints, pelvis, back, sciatica.
 
Management
Three-step analgesic ladder: injection with local anaesthetics, steroids, anti-inflammatories.

Mechanism
Possibly autonomic dysfunction.

myofascial pain syndrome

(mī″ă-făsh′ăl, shē-ăl),

MFP

A chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder characterized by the presence of trigger points; decreased range of motion in affected muscle groups; weakness; and, on occasion, local autonomic disturbances such as localized perspiration.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition the sustained contractile activity, metabolic alterations, and cell stress trigger the increased release of myokines, inflammatory cytokines, and neurotransmitters that also undoubtedly contribute to these myofascial trigger points and myofascial pain syndrome.
Dry needling of trigger points with and without paraspinal needling in myofascial pain syndromes in elderly patients.
161, 172 (1997); see also Thomas Bohr, Problems with Myofascial Pain Syndrome and Fibromyalgia Syndrome, 46 NEUROLOGY 593, 593-94 (1996).
Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, and myofascial pain syndromes.
This is the route of proving myofascial pain syndrome -- pain within the body of the muscle.
Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) is caused by myofascial Trigger Points (TPs) located within taut bands of skeletal muscle fibres.
Many women who have myofascial pain syndrome and CPP respond poorly to traditional treatment with physical therapy and trigger-point injections; this may be due to inflammatory or neuropathic changes, or both.
Of the 59 patients in the study, 34 were diagnosed with degenerative disk disease, 29 with symptomatic protrusion/herniation, 28 with myofascial pain syndrome, 24 with spinal stenosis, 20 with lumbar strain, 20 with sacroiliac dysfunction, 20 with nonspecific lower back pain, 18 with internal disc disruption/annular tear, 18 with lumbar facet-mediated pain, 18 with symptomatic spondylolisthesis/spondylolysis, and 20 with other diagnoses.
For example, a good diagnosis for chronic musculoskeletal pain is myofascial pain syndrome.
In this case, the defendant's negligence caused two injuries - the ordinary whiplash injury and the extraordinary myofascial pain syndrome that followed.