myoelastic

my·o·e·las·tic

(mī'ō-ē-las'tik),
Pertaining to closely associated smooth muscle fibers and elastic connective tissue.

my·o·e·las·tic

(mī'ō-ē-las'tik)
Pertaining to closely associated smooth muscle fibers and elastic connective tissue.

myoelastic

(mī″ō-ē-lăs′tĭk)
Pert. to smooth muscle and elastic tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Your vocal folds close to meet that rising flow, and begin to open and close in an aerodynamic, myoelastic oscillation.
Besides helping to describe vocal behavior, it is used to verify how the patient controls the aerodynamic forces of the expiratory air current and the myoelastic forces of the larynx [2,4,6-8,12-15].
pennati): a light and electron microscopic study on a myoelastic system.
Although Yamasaki et al., did not describe the presence of myeloelastic sphincters in the river dolphins lungs, our findings demonstrated that myoelastic sphincters (Fig.
Extrinsic muscles of the larynx also assist in positioning the larynx in the neck, with attachments to the base of the tongue, mandible, pharynx and sternum The myoelastic and aerodynamic properties of the larynx are fundamental to phonation and airway protection.
The effect of enlarged airways on spirometry derives from the weakness of the tracheobronchial walls and hypotonia in the myoelastic elements, resulting in dynamic airway compression (expiratory collapse during forced exhalation) and dynamic restriction.
He also mentioned that the medial layer in ICA and ECA in dog showed myoelastic histoarchitecture having predominance of smooth muscle fibres which may be due to local subjection to functional adaptations.
These exercises affect normal laryngeal tension by equalizing myoelastic and aerodynamic forces, and they also enhance the coordination of respiration, phonation and articulation.
For example, in explaining what causes the vocal folds to produce sound, perhaps an initial discussion of the Bernoulli effect is sufficient, even though it is not completely accurate without a discussion of the myoelastic aerodynamic theory of phonation and inertive reactance.
Authors point out that the MPTs show the control between the aerodynamic forces of the pulmonary current and the myoelastic forces of the larynx [9].
In humans, tracheomalacia is associated with weakness of the tracheal walls because of softening of the supporting cartilage and hypotonia of the myoelastic elements.