contraction

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contraction

 [kon-trak´shun]
a drawing together; a shortening or shrinkage.
Braxton Hicks c's see braxton hicks contractions.
carpopedal contraction the condition resulting from chronic shortening of the muscles of the upper and lower limbs including the fingers and toes, seen in tetany.
concentric contraction contraction resulting in shortening of a muscle, used to perform positive work or to accelerate a body part. It is metabolically more demanding than an eccentric contraction. Called also shortening contraction.
Dupuytren's contraction Dupuytren's contracture.
eccentric contraction contraction in the presence of a resistive force that results in elongation of a muscle, used to perform negative work or to decelerate a body part. It is less metabolically demanding than a concentric contraction but may cause disruption of associated connective tissue with delayed soreness or frank injury if it occurs in an unaccustomed manner. Called also lengthening contraction.
end-diastolic premature ventricular contraction a ventricular ectopic beat falling at the end of diastole; it may or may not be slightly premature and may or may not be a fusion beat.
haustral c's muscular contractions of the wall of the large intestine during which the haustra can be seen more easily; called also haustrations.
isometric contraction muscle contraction without appreciable shortening or change in distance between its origin and insertion.
isotonic contraction muscle contraction without appreciable change in the force of contraction; the distance between the origin and insertion becomes lessened.
lengthening contraction eccentric contraction.
postural contraction the state of muscular tension and contraction that just suffices to maintain the posture of the body.
segmental c's muscular contractions of the small intestine that serve to mix and transport chyme.
shortening contraction concentric contraction.
contraction stress test observation of the fetal heart rate in response to uterine contractions; see also fetal monitoring.
tetanic contraction (tonic contraction) physiological tetanus.
Volkmann's contraction Volkmann's contracture.

con·trac·tion (C),

(kon-trak'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with contracture.
1. A shortening or increase in tension; denoting the normal function of muscle.
2. Shrinkage or reduction in size.
3. Heart beat, as in premature contraction.
[L. contractus, drawn together]

contraction

(kən-trăk′shən)
n.
1. The act of contracting or the state of being contracted.
2.
a. A word, as won't from will not, or phrase, as o'clock from of the clock, formed by omitting or combining some of the sounds of a longer phrase.
b. The formation of such a word.
3. Physiology The shortening and thickening of functioning muscle or muscle fiber.
4. A period of decreased business activity.

contraction

Cardiology A heart beat. See Premature ventricular contraction GI disease The shortening of the muscularis propria of the GI tract, resulting in peristalsis. See Giant peristaltic contraction Obstetrics The shortening of myometrial cells, resulting in ↑ intrauterine tension. See Braxton Hicks contraction Physiology A ↓ in muscle length, accompanied by ↑ tension. See Concentration contraction, Isometric contraction, Isotonic contraction.

con·trac·tion

(C) (kŏn-trak'shŭn)
1. A shortening or increase in tension; denoting the normal function of muscle.
2. A shrinkage or reduction in size.
3. Heart beat, as in premature contraction.
[L. contractus, drawn together]

contraction

The primary function of muscle by which a change of shape brings the ends closer together. By contracting, muscles bring about movement of bones or other parts. The term comes from a Latin word meaning ‘to draw together’ so, strictly, a phrase such as ‘isotonic contraction’ is a contradiction in terms. Popular usage, however, will have it that a muscle can contract without shortening.

Contraction

A tightening of the uterus during pregnancy. Contractions may or may not be painful and may or may not indicate labor.
Mentioned in: Premature Labor

con·trac·tion

(kŏn-trak'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with contracture.
1. Condition wherein maxillary and mandibular structures are closer than normal to median plane.
2. A shortening or increase in tension; denoting the normal function of muscle.
3. Shrinkage or reduction in size.
[L. contractus, drawn together]
References in periodicals archive ?
Strain and SR derived from SRI reflect an improved assessment of myocardial contraction and quantification of regional myocardial deformation in humans.
Both microbial and endogenous proinflammatory mediators, such as bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)), IL-1, and TNF-[alpha], may directly depress myocardial contraction [16].
Secondly, regional myocardial velocity does not always reflect regional myocardial contraction. In patients with conduction delay and impaired systolic function, one region of the LV myocardium pulls the other and passive motion is a common finding.
Levosimendan enhances myocardial contraction by sensitising myofilaments to intracellular calcium (4), as well as causing vasodilatation via activation of adenosine triphosphate-dependent potassium channels ([K.sub.ATP]) (5-7).
A different EBCT technique has used radii to look at myocardial contraction. The ventricle at each level can be interrogated by radii, thereby generating data relating to regional segmental performance (contractility) and EF.