myoblastoma


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Related to myoblastoma: medulloblastoma, glioblastoma

myoblastoma

 [mi″o-blas-to´mah]
a benign circumscribed tumorlike lesion of soft tissue.

my·o·blas·to·ma

(mī'ō-blas-tō'mă),
A tumor of immature muscle cells.
[myo- + G. blastos, germ, + -oma, tumor]

my·o·blas·to·ma

(mī'ō-blas-tō'mă)
A tumor of immature muscle cells.
[myo- + G. blastos, germ, + -oma, tumor]

my·o·blas·to·ma

(mī'ō-blas-tō'mă)
A tumor of immature muscle cells.
[myo- + G. blastos, germ, + -oma, tumor]
References in periodicals archive ?
Multiple granular cell tumours ("myoblastoma"): case report with electron microscopic observations and review of the literature.
Granular cell myoblastoma of the breast: a report of 2 cases.
Abrikossoff (2) first described the entity of GCT of the tongue in 1926 as granular cell myoblastoma, claiming a myogenic origin.
[Multiple myoblastoma with bronchial, lingual and parotid locations].
Abrikossoff was the first to describe this tumor in the literature as a myoblastoma. Over the following 60 years the tumor was thought to be neural in origin since it was observed that tumors arising in the extremities were related to the radial and sciatic nerve trunks.
Although granular cell tumors (also referred to as choristomas and granular cell myoblastomas) and pituicytomas are low grade and may have a shared histogenesis, they represent 2 distinct lesions pathologically, and we prefer reserving the designation pituicytoma for low-grade spindled lesions.
Multicentric tracheobronchial and oesophageal granular cell myoblastoma. Thorax 1978;33:596-602.
Multiple granular cell tumors ("myoblastomas"): Case report with electron microscopic observations and review of the literature.
However, the histogenesis of these tumors is controversial, evident by various terms in the literature that have attempted to describe GCT, including choristoma, tumorlet, myoblastoma, and pituicytoma.
Schild, "Rhabdomyoma of larynx: ultrastructural study and comparison with granular cell tumors (myoblastomas)," Cancer, vol.
The differential diagnosis of Riga-Fede disease includes infectious diseases such as syphilis, tuberculosis or ulcerative candidiasis, and neoplasms such as lymphomas, sarcomas or granular cell myoblastomas. [11, 12] Biopsy is important to exclude some of the above if they are suspected.
Granular cell tumors, first described by Abrikossoff in 1926 as myoblastomas [1], are tumors of Schwannian cell origin that may be classified as either benign or malignant.