myelotoxic

myelotoxic

 [mi´ĕ-lo-tok″sik]
1. destructive to bone marrow.
3. arising from diseased bone marrow.

my·e·lo·tox·ic

(mī'ĕ-lō-tok'sik),
1. Inhibitory, depressant, or destructive to one or more of the components of bone marrow.
2. Pertaining to, derived from, or manifesting the features of diseased bone marrow.

my·e·lo·tox·ic

(mī'ĕ-lō-tok'sik)
1. Inhibitory, depressant, or destructive to one or more of the components of bone marrow.
2. Pertaining to, derived from, or manifesting the features of diseased bone marrow.
References in periodicals archive ?
(50,52) Previous use of myelotoxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy to red marrow are strong predictors of hematotoxicity following PRRT.
Cases of chemotherapy (myelotoxic) induced pancytopenia were excluded.
A known myelotoxic agent, benzene affects erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets, respectively causing anemia, polychromasia, basophilic stippling and peripheral erythroblasts, lymphopenia and thrombocytopenia (28).
Numerous studies conducted have shown that the frequency of each condition differs considerably depending on the differences in methodology, stringency of diagnostic criteria, period of observation, geographic area, age pattern, nutritional status, prevalence of infectious diseases, genetic differences, and varying exposure to myelotoxic agents among other factors.
The randomised, multi-centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study investigated the safety and efficacy of a once-per-cycle dose of F-627 in women with stage II-IV breast cancer who are receiving myelotoxic TA chemotherapy treatment (Taxotere (docetaxel + Adriamycin (doxorubicin)), with participants randomised 2:1.
There was no myelotoxic effect or autoimmune effect on peripheral blood cells which may be due to the fact that that the tested material was not in contact with blood [13, 22] but also due to the chemical composition of the material whose biocompatibility has already been confirmed in many studies [14-21].
Among these side effects, the most serious one that raises the most controversy is the myelotoxic effect.
Tacrolimus metabolite M-III may have nephrotoxic and myelotoxic effects and increase the incidence of infections in kidney transplant recipients.
The etiology of thrombocytopenia in liver disease include portal hypertension (through hypersplenism), antibody-mediated platelet destruction (mainly in viral hepatitis), decreased thrombopoietin production by diseased liver and myelotoxic effects of alcohol and hepatitis virus6.
In addition, the shortened platelet mean lifetime and myelotoxic effects of alcohol or hepatitis viruses also reduced the platelet count.