myelosuppression


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suppression

 [sŭ-presh´un]
the act of holding back or checking.
1. the stopping or inhibition of something, such as a secretion, excretion, normal discharge, or other function.
2. in psychiatry, conscious inhibition of an unacceptable impulse or idea as contrasted with repression, which is unconscious.
3. in genetics, a second mutation occurring at a site different from the first mutation site and able to mask or suppress the phenotypic expression of the first mutation; the organism appears to be reverted but is in fact doubly mutant.
4. inhibition of the erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium to prevent clinical attacks of malaria; used for prophylaxis.
5. cortical inhibition of perception of objects in all or part of the visual field of one eye during binocular vision.
bone marrow suppression reduction of the cell-forming functions of bone marrow, such as by a drug or because of replacement of the marrow by a disease process. Called also myelophthisis and myelosuppression.
labor suppression in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as controlling uterine contractions prior to 37 weeks of gestation to prevent preterm birth. See also labor.
lactation suppression in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating the cessation of lactation and minimizing breast engorgement after childbirth.
overdrive suppression the suppression of intrinsic cellular automaticity by a rapid outside stimulus. In cardiology this refers to the inhibitory effect of a faster pacemaker on a slower pacemaker. The faster rate causes an accumulation of intracellular sodium, stimulating the sodium-potassium pump, which hyperpolarizes the cell so that it takes longer to reach threshold potential. This phenomenon is present in healthy His-Purkinje cells but decreases with a decrease in membrane potential and loss of fast sodium channels.

myelosuppression

Oncology The suppression–usually an undesired side effect–of normal BM activity, often the result of RT, chemotherapy, or various toxins. Cf Myelosuppressive therapy.

my·e·lo·sup·pres·sion

(mī'ĕ-lō-sŭ-presh'ŭn)
A reduction in the ability of the bone marrow to produce blood cells: platelets, red blood cells, and white blood cells. Typically caused by cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy. During the period of myelosuppression, patients may be at an increased risk of infection or bleeding or may experience symptoms of anemia.
[G. myelos, marrow, + L. suppressio, pressing under]

my·e·lo·sup·pres·sion

(mī'ĕ-lō-sŭ-presh'ŭn)
A reduction in the ability of the bone marrow to produce blood cells: platelets, red blood cells, and white blood cells.
[G. myelos, marrow, + L. suppressio, pressing under]
References in periodicals archive ?
[13] 2016 Retrospective study N = 40 (only patients with myelosuppression were included) Mameli et al.
Ganciclovir can cause myelosuppression leading to leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia [106, 211].
Chemotherapy can improve the therapeutic outcome; however increase in the dose is associated with toxic side effects, most common of which is myelosuppression. Myelosuppression if severe can lead to life threatening infections and hemorrhage.
Lee, "A study of the effect of sequential injection of 5-androstenediol on irradiation-induced myelosuppression in mice," Archives of Pharmacal Research, vol.
However, several adverse effects induced by medical treatments in patients with breast cancer include fatigue, phlebitis, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, mucositis, myelosuppression, cardiac toxicity, renal toxicity, and hepatotoxicity.
Myelosuppression is minimal with MMC and is most commonly seen with the use of intravesical thiotepa.
Decreased Hb and TEC levels could be due to epistaxis, petechial hemorrhages, myelosuppression or due to severe anemia (Bhadesiya and Raval, 2015), neutrophilia (73.24 [+ or -] 1.09%), lymphocytopenia (20.10[+ or -]2.07%), monocytosis (4.25 [+ or -]1.31%) with normal range of eosinophils (2.41[+ or -] 0.29%) were recorded in epistaxis dogs in comparison with apparently healthy dogs.
The reasons for discontinuing treatment with AZA after 34 days of use were of the following: hepatitis (2 patients), vomiting (5), pancreatitis (1), myelosuppression (1), joint pain (1), infection (1), general malaise (1).
The main side effects of cisplatin are nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, ototoxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity and myelosuppression. The toxicities were frequently occurred in considerable numbers of patients and many of their treatments could not be completed as scheduled.
Because this drug carries a risk of myelosuppression due to induced neutropenia, (6) it was recommended that a CBC count be performed every 2 weeks at discharge.
Further, in preclinical studies, APP-111 appeared to have less peripheral neurotoxicity and myelosuppression than currently available antitubulin cytotoxic agents.
As for our patient, a bone marrow examination ruled out myelosuppression.