myelophthisis


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myelophthisis

 [mi″ĕ-lo-thi´sis]
1. wasting of the spinal cord.

my·e·loph·thi·sis

(mī'ĕ-lof'thi-sis, mī'ĕ-lō-tī'sis, -tē'sis),
1. Wasting or atrophy of the spinal cord as in tabes dorsalis.
2. Replacement of hematopoietic tissue in the bone marrow by abnormal tissue, usually fibrous tissue or malignant tumors that are most commonly metastatic carcinomas. Synonym(s): panmyelophthisis
[myelo- + G. phthisis, a wasting away]

panmyelophthisis

(1) Bone marrow replacement by native or non-native cells (e.g., myeloma, metastatic malignancy), fibrosis or inflammation.
(2) Aplastic anaemia, see there.

my·e·loph·thi·sis

(mī'ĕ-lof'thi-sis)
1. Wasting or atrophy of the spinal cord as in tabes dorsalis.
2. Replacement of hemopoietic tissue in the bone marrow by abnormal tissue, usually fibrous tissue metastatic carcinomas.
Synonym(s): panmyelophthisis.
[myelo- + G. phthisis, a wasting away]

my·e·loph·thi·sis

(mī'ĕ-lof'thi-sis)
Wasting or atrophy of the spinal cord. Replacement of hemopoietic tissue in the bone marrow by abnormal tissue.
Synonym(s): panmyelophthisis.
[myelo- + G. phthisis, a wasting away]
References in periodicals archive ?
Likely causes of the anemia included myelophthisis, bone marrow suppression secondary to chemotherapy, and anemia of chronic disease (29) The decreased thrombocytes were presumably caused by either myelophthisis secondary to the CLL or bone marrow suppression secondary to chlorambucil.
The right pelvic limb lameness could have been caused by bone pain secondary to myelophthisis, although other causes, such as trauma resulting from generalized weakness, cannot be ruled out.
We report a case in which myelophthisis in the setting of apparently localized rectal carcinoma was confirmed to be secondary to spread from rectal primary and consider the implications of this observation.
Myelophthisis as a solitary manifestation of failure in rectal cancer may be an extreme and rare example of the Batson phenomenon in rectal cancer metastases, but it draws renewed attention to the experimentally established validity and clinical implications of this mode of spread in pelvic neoplasms.[10] A better understanding of the role of the Batson plexus in rectal cancer and the implications of bone marrow micrometastases could influence the approach to staging and therapy in these patients.
Clinical spectrum of myelophthisis in cancer patients.
Opportunistic complications and myelophthisis caused by malignancies such as lymphoma represent the underlying cause for anemia in a large number of HIV-infected patients.