myelomeningocele


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myelomeningocele

 [mi″ĕ-lo-mĕ-ning´go-sēl]
hernial protrusion of the spinal cord and its meninges through a defect in the vertebral arch (spina bifida); see also neural tube defect. Called also meningomyelocele.
Child with a large thoraco-lumbar myelomeningocele consisting of protruding spinal cord covered by meninges. From Mueller and Young, 2001.

me·nin·go·my·e·lo·cele

(mĕ-ning'gō-mī'ĕ-lō-sēl'),
Protrusion of the spinal cord and its membranes through a defect in the vertebral column.
[meningo- + G. myelos, marrow, + kēlē, tumor]

myelomeningocele

(mī′ə-lō-mə-nĭng′gə-sēl′)
n.
A severe form of spina bifida in which the meninges and spinal cord protrude through a defect in the vertebral column.

meningomyelocele

Protrusion of the spinal meninges and cord through a defect of the vertebral column, usually at the distal end; when accompanied by a bone defect, it is termed spina bifida.

Epidemiology
1:5000 births.

Other findings
Often accompanied by midline defects—e.g., of the anus, heart and trachea (tracheo-oesophageal fistulas).

myelomeningocele

Neonatology A common birth defect characterized by nonclosure of the vertebral and spinal canal, resulting in protrusion of spinal cord and covering meninges from the dorsal surface; spina bifida is a more generic term which includes any defect characterized by incomplete spinal closure; myelomeningocele accounts for ±75% of all spina bifida, affecting ±1/800 infants; most of the rest are spina bifida occulta–the vertebral arches don't close, the spinal cord and meninges are simply covered by skin, and meningoceles–in which the meninges protrude through the vertebral defect while the spinal cord remains in place Etiology Unknown; folic acid deficiency may play a part in neural tube defects; it has a familial tendency, possibly triggered by a viral infection or environmental factors–eg, radiation; protrusion of cord and meninges damages the spinal cord and nerve roots, compromising function at or below the defect; most defects are lower lumbar or sacral, as these regions are the last to close in the early embryo Clinical Partial or complete paralysis, loss of sensation, bladder or bowel control; the exposed cord is at risk for infection. See Hydrocephalus, Hip dislocation, Spina bifida, Syringomyelia.

me·nin·go·my·e·lo·cele

(mĕ-ning'gō-mī'ĕ-lō-sēl)
Protrusion of the meninges and spinal cord through a defect in the vertebral column.
Synonym(s): myelocystomeningocele, myelomeningocele.
[meningo- + G. myelos, marrow, + kēlē, tumor]

myelomeningocele

See MENINGOMYELOCELE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shunt infections developed in 180 (22.67%) of 794 patients with myelomeningocele, in 9 (5.45%) of 165 patients with congenital obstructive HCP (without myelomeningocele), in 9 (14.51%) of 62 patients with intraventricular haemorrhage; however, recurrent shunt infection occurred in 54 (27.27%) of 198 patients with a previous shunt infection (Table-1).
Kropp, "Preservation of renal function in children with myelomeningocele managed with basic newborn evaluation and close followup," The Journal of Urology, vol.
Activity level, functional health, and quality of life of children with myelomeningocele as perceived by parents.
Myelomeningocele is a sacculation of the meninx and spinal cord through a vertebral defect that develops because of a closure defect of the posterior neuropore, which is the latest phase of neurulation in the third and fourth weeks of gestation.
"Since our fetal cell treatment is minimally invasive, it has the potential to become a much-needed novel treatment for myelomeningocele."
There were 3 more cases, each afflicted from partial agenesis of corpus callosum, granuloma and associated myelomeningocele respectively.
I have the worst form, called myelomeningocele. I wasn't supposed to walk, but I have never even used a wheelchair (besides for long shopping trips and amusement park visits).
Composite scores were computed using the following coding scheme: myelomeningocele type (1 = no, 2 = yes), shunt status (1 = no, 2 = yes), ambulation status (1 = no assistance/ankle-foot orthoses, 2 = knee-ankle-foot orthoses/hip-knee-ankle-foot orthoses, 3 = wheelchair assistance), voiding status (1 = spontaneous voiding, 2 = CIC/wearing a pad), and defecation status (1 = spontaneous defecation, 2 = enema/ laxatives/wearing a pad/antegrade continent enema).
Although the classic example is the child with a myelomeningocele, a significant number of our patients have other spinal cord defects, including lipomyelomeningocele, fatty filum, and occult tethered cords.
Calculation of the ETVSS * Score Age Etiology 0 <1 mo Postinfectious 10 1 mo to <6 mos 20 Myelomeningocele, IVH, nontectal brain tumor 30 6 mos to <1 yr Aqueductal stenosis, tectal tumor, other 40 1 yr to < 10 yrs 50 [greater than or equal to]10 yrs Calculation of the ETVSS * Score Previous Shunt 0 Previous shunt 10 No previous shunt 20 30 40 50 * The ETVSS is calculated as age score + etiology score + previous shunt score.