myelocyte


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myelocyte

 [mi´ĕ-lo-sīt″]
1. a precursor in the granulocytic series intermediate between a promyelocyte and a metamyelocyte, normally occurring only in the bone marrow. In this stage, differentiation into specific cytoplasmic granules has begun.
2. any cell of the gray matter of the nervous system. adj., adj myelocyt´ic.

my·e·lo·cyte

(mī'ĕ-lō-sīt),
1. A young cell of the granulocytic series, occurring normally in bone marrow, but not in circulating blood (except in certain diseases). When stained with the usual dyes, the cytoplasm is distinctly basophilic and relatively more abundant than in myeloblasts or promyelocytes, even though myelocyte's are smaller cells; numerous cytoplasmic granules (that is, neutrophilic, eosinophilic, or basophilic) are present in the more mature forms of myelocyte's, and the first two types are peroxidase positive. The nuclear chromatin is coarser than that observed in myeloblasts, but it is relatively faintly stained and lacks a well-defined membrane; the nucleus is fairly regular in contour (that is, not indented), and seems to be "buried" beneath the numerous cytoplasmic granules.
2. A nerve cell of the gray matter of the brain or spinal cord. Synonym(s): medullocell
[myelo- + G. kytos, cell]

myelocyte

(mī′ə-lə-sīt′)
n.
A large cell of the bone marrow that is a precursor of the mature granulocyte of the blood.

my′e·lo·cyt′ic (-sĭt′ĭk) adj.

myelocyte

A round to oval, variably sized (10–18 µm in diameter) cell found in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation, which is generally smaller than a promyelocyte, and has an occasionally flattened or indented, central or eccentric nucleus generally lacking a nucleolus with variable chromatin clumping. The N:C ratio is 2:1 to 1:1. The cytoplasm is abundant, stains bluish-pink, light pink, or is colourless; it contains some reddish-purple azurophilic (primary) granules and/or numerous fine, lilac, specific (secondary) granules.

my·e·lo·cyte

(mī'ĕ-lō-sīt)
1. A young cell of the granulocytic series, occurring normally in bone marrow, but not in circulating blood. When stained, the cytoplasm is distinctly basophilic and more abundant than in myeloblasts or promyelocytes; numerous cytoplasmic granules are present in the more mature forms. The nucleus is regular in contour, i.e., not indented, and seems to be "buried" beneath the numerous cytoplasmic granules.
2. A nerve cell of the gray matter of the brain or spinal cord.
[myelo- + G. kytos, cell]

myelocyte

An immature white blood cell normally found in the bone marrow.

my·e·lo·cyte

(mī'ĕ-lō-sīt)
1. A young cell of the granulocytic series, occurring normally in bone marrow, but not in circulating blood.
2. A nerve cell of the gray matter of the brain or spinal cord.
[myelo- + G. kytos, cell]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, there was significantly increased infiltration of lymphocytes in IDC tissues compared to controls (Fig.3), while there was no difference in myelocytes infiltration in IDC compared to control tissues.
Differentials: Blast: 18, myelocyte: 03, metamyelocyte: 02, ban d forms: 03, neutrophils: 55,
Morphologic Features of t(8;21) and inv(16) Acute Myeloid Leukemia t(8;21) inv(16) * Large myeloid blasts with * Variable number of eosinophils abundant basophilic cytoplasm * Numerous azurophilic granules * All stages of eosinophilic maturation * Perinuclear clearing or hofs * Immature purple-violet cytoplasmic granules * Occasional blasts containing * Mainly evident at the Auer rods promyelocyte and myelocyte stages Table 2.
Promyelocytes or myelocytes were observed in 77% of patients given Neulasta, compared to 14% of patients given Plinabulin and neutrophil bands were observed in more than 25% of patients given Neulasta, compared to 0% of patients given Plinabulin.
The blood film was leucoerythroblastic with occasional circulating nucleated red blood cells and myelocytes. The polychromatic red cells showed fine basophilic stippling, randomly distributed throughout the cell, with variable numbers of blue inclusions within each cell (Figures 1-4).
Laboratory investigations showed haemoglobin 5.7gm./dl; Total leukocyte count 614.8x10 9 /l, Myeloblast 65%, Promyelocytes 10%, Myelocytes 26%, Metamyelocytes 18%, Band cells 4%, Neutrophils 30% and Lymphocytes 7%: ESR 2mm, platelets 709x10 12 /L.
The patient's complete blood count revealed a hemoglobin of 10.2 g/dL, hematocrit of 33% and platelets of 357 x [10.sup.9]/L, and a corrected WBC count due to the presence of nucleated red blood cells of 60.7 x [10.sup.9]/L including 50% neutrophils, 19% lymphocytes, 10% bands, 7% myelocytes, 7% metamyelocytes, 1% promyelocytes, 5% monocytes, and 1% blasts.
His initial labs were also notable for an elevated white blood cell count of 51k/cumm (normal 6-18), with 38% bands, 5% myelocytes, and 8% metamyelocytes, an ammonia of 211mCmol/L (normal 11-35), and a lactate of 1.8mmol/L (normal 0.5-1.6).
This translocation results in production of the fusion protein PML-RARA which represses nuclear gene transcription, arresting myelocytes at the promyelocytic stage of maturation [2, 7].
The infiltrate of eosinophils consisted of eosinophilic myelocytes and mature eosinophils.
However, other studies failed to reveal this correlation because HNP1-3 proteins are mainly expressed in bone marrow precursors of neutrophils, promyelocytes, and early myelocytes [11, 18, 33].
Three months before admission to our department, her laboratory parameters were as follows: leukocytes 4,120/[mm.sup.3], neutrophils 48%, monocytes 5%, hemoglobin 11.9 g/dl, platelets 139,000/[mm.sup.3], normal LDH, myelocytes 2%, and metamyelocytes 4% with the appearance of 1% blasts.