mutualism

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Related to mutualistic: Symbiotic Relationships

mutualism

 [mu´choo͡-al-izm]
the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it. adj., adj mutualis´-tic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myū'chū-ăl-izm),
Symbiotic relationship in which both species derive benefit. Compare: commensalism, metabiosis, parasitism.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mutualism

(myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
An association between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits.

mu′tu·al·ist n.
mu′tu·al·is′tic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myū'chyū-ăl-izm)
Symbiotic relationship from which both species derive benefit.
Compare: commensalism, metabiosis, parasitism
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mutualism

see SYMBIOSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Mutualistic stability in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: exploring hypotheses of evolutionary cooperation.
In view of the extraordinary complementarity of the association between mutualistic symbionts and psyllids (Sloan and Moran, 2012), the sensitivity of D.
"Fungal Endophytes in Stem and Leaves: From Laten Pathogen to Mutualistic Symbiont.
It has been found that as part of this mutualistic relationship, coral species living in shallow waters produce a bright florescence to shield the zooxanthellae from the harmful effects of the sun.
The same fungi that support orchids are they themselves dependent on select tree species for similar mutualistic relationships.
The growth parameter of host plants is one of important indicator for the efficiency of DSE mutualistic association.
Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) (Rhabditida: Heterorhabditidae, Steinernematidae) are key control agents of insect pests because of their association with mutualistic bacteria Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus, which are released into the hemocoel of insects by infective juveniles (IJs) of the genera Steinernema and Heterorhabditis, respectively, causing septicemia and rapid death of the host within 24 to 48 h (Adams and Nguyen 2002).
The relationship between Ina and human symbionts is mutualistic. Joan, a female Ina member discloses this interdependency as such:
While most Pseudomyrmecinae nest in twigs and branches, others are found in herbaceous vegetation (Ward, 1985) or enter mutualistic relationships with particular plants (Wheeler, 1942; Janzen, 1966).
That unionistic and mutualistic transformation might results in more beneficial, supportive, consolidating and solidarity spirit among the integrateable territories of the Nile Basin.
(9,10) Further research is currently being performed on P acnes in regards to both its mutualistic and parasitic properties.