mute

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Related to muteness: Apraxia of Speech

mute

 [mūt]
1. unable or unwilling to speak, such as because of deafness.
2. to muffle or soften a sound.

mute

(myūt),
1. Unable or unwilling to speak.
2. A person who does not have the faculty of speech.
[L. mutus]

mute

(myo͞ot)
adj. muter, mutest
1. Refraining from producing speech or vocal sound.
2.
a. Offensive Unable to speak.
b. Unable to vocalize, as certain animals.
n.
Offensive One who is incapable of speech.

mute′ly adv.
mute′ness n.

mute

(myūt)
1. Unable or unwilling to speak.
2. A person who does not have the faculty of speech.
[L. mutus]
References in periodicals archive ?
Smart environments are environments of miscommunication oriented toward muteness. They are, primarily, gestural, haptic, intuitive, immediate and non-textual.
Drawing on Winnicott's theories of being alone and Nancy's poetic conjuring of what it feels like to fall asleep, we hear in Dorothy's and William's writing what Jacobus calls "the audible sounds of life" in even the quietest moments of solitude or muteness (117).
There is a sense of stillness in many of these writings that one does not find in the expression of other major subjects for poetry, such as love or the ending of love, and the poems collected in Time of Grief seem to each display a sort of cognitive muteness. In Eugenio de Andrade's "Brief September Elegy," he writes of someone he has lost, whom he is afraid to call out to, indeed "afraid of breaking the thread / with which you weave unremembered days." He asks, "With what words / or kisses or tears / can one awake the dead without harming them ...?" Perhaps this is another way of saying that we must meet the depths of experience with a sense of courage and dignity toward the memory of those we have lost.
From the monstrosity of the top commanders to the muteness of the many who must have seen, heard, known or suspected - the facts must be faced and learned from.
Hardin, "Middleton, Plautus, and the Ethics of Comedy" (296-311); Meredith Molly Hand, "More lies than true tales': Scepticism in Middleton's Mock-Almanacs" (312-29); Heidi Brayman Hackel, "Staging Muteness in Middleton" (330-45); Stephen Guy-Bray, "Middleton's Language Machine" (346-59); David Glimp, "Middleton and the Theatre of Emergency" (360-75); Indira Ghose, "Middleton and the Culture of Courtesy" (376-89); Gabriel Gbadamosi, "Playwright to Playwright: The Changeling" (390-403); Barbara Fuchs, "Middleton and Spain" (404-17); Ewan Fernie, "Wisdom in Reverse" (418-36); Lars Engle, "Middleton and Mimetic Desire" (437-51); Celia R.
Most importantly is the muteness of the first few minutes.
Back in college, Yuknavitch and her classmates were assigned Sigmund Freud's 1905 case study of "Dora," a bisexual 18-year-old who spent years fending off sexual advances by a family friend--and manifested her trauma through spates of muteness and coughing fits.
During these sessions, the child's expressions gradually increased in both content and creativity, reducing their muteness. Kato (2006) compared the effects of block creations using scores gained on the Profile of Mood States (POMS; McNair, Lorr, & Droppelman, 1981) before and after the creation.
It is an idea that has been provocatively raised by Barbara Johnson, who in her reading of Jane Campion's The Piano (1993) argues that muteness can represent "a form of resistance and subject-hood" (1998, 143).
liberated from its (allegedly self-imposed) muteness by the narrator,
Even when voiced--the exception--his speech was mute, and the muteness and muttering of the broadly framed, black-haired painter could make his students uncomfortable.
Here, the elements of a political discourse (morality, community, approval (law), and competence) are examined simultaneously in order to show how the discourse elements in narratives on revolution are configured, and how certain elements express saliency and muteness. The discourse of the revolution is investigated through two notions: the emergence of the Russian state, and the socio-economic transformation that appears to be activated by the responders.