mustard


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Related to mustard: mustard gas

mustard

 [mus´terd]
1. a plant of the genus Brassica.
2. the ripe seeds of Brassica alba (white mustard) and B. nigra (black mustard), whose oils have irritant, stimulant, and emetic properties.
3. resembling, or something resembling, mustard in one or more of its properties.
nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine.

mus·tard

(mŭs'tărd),
1. The dried ripe seeds of Brassica alba (white mustard) and B. nigra (black mustard) (family Cruciferae).
2. Synonym(s): mustard gas
[O.Fr. moustarde, fr. L. mustum, must]

mustard

/mus·tard/ (mus´terd)
1. a plant of the genus Brassica.
2. the ripe seeds of Brassica alba (white mustard) and B. nigra (black mustard), whose oils have irritant, stimulant, and emetic properties.
3. resembling, or something resembling, mustard in one or more of its properties.

nitrogen mustard 
2. any of a group of cytotoxic, blistering alkylating agents homologous to the vesicant war gas dichlorodiethyl sulfide (mustard gas), some of which have been used as antineoplastics and immunosuppressants.

mustard

(1) Black mustard, see there; Brassica nigra.  
(2) White mustard, see there; Sinapsis alba.

mus·tard

(mŭs'tărd)
1. A plant of the genus Brassica with pungent edible seeds.
2. A semisolid preparation of mustard seeds used as a condiment.
3. A material having the appearance or consistency of mustard (2).
[O.Fr. moustarde, fr. L. mustum, must]

mustard,

n Latin names:
Brassica nigra, Brassica alba; part used: seeds; uses: diuretic, emetic, anti-inflammatory, mustard plaster for topical treatment of congestive respiratory complaints; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, kidney disorders, ulcers, corrosive to unprotected skin, asthma. Also called
black mustard, brown mustard, California rape, charlock, Chinese mustard, Indian mustard, white mustard, or
wild mustard.

mustard

an irritant compound derived from the dried ripe seed of Brassica (Sinapis) alba, B. nigra or B. juncea. Contains toxic allyl isothiocyanate in nontoxic glycoside form, though the plant also contains myrosinase, an enzyme that converts the glycoside to the toxic form. Used as a carminative, emetic and counterirritant in poultices.

mustard gas
one of several gases used in military activities, e.g. dichlorodiethylsulfide. Causes vesication of skin, blindness due to corneal damage, and pulmonary edema if inhaled.
mustard greens
green foliage of several mustard-type plants, used in salads.
mustard oil
present in high concentrations in mustard plants and causes acute indigestion in animals.
mustard oil glucosinolates
toxic oil glucosinolates found in plants.
sulfur mustard
a synthetic compound with vesicant and other toxic properties.
tansy mustard
References in classic literature ?
Father Brown, who was making the salad, tipped two spoonfuls of the mustard into the tumbler of water beside him; stood up and said in a new, loud and sudden voice--"Drink that
I don't know how many worlds there may be in the universe, but anyone who had brought me a spoonful of mustard at that precise moment could have had them all.
Harris said he would have given worlds for mustard too.
In the midst of the worst paroxysm Charlie came to leave a message from his mother, and was met by Phebe coming despondently downstairs with a mustard plaster that had brought no relief.
Don't hold that confounded thing right under my nose; the mustard makes my eyes smart.
The application of lawyers to John Tarwater was like the application of a mustard plaster.
Her hat, which was flowery, resembled those punnets, covered with flannel, which we sowed with mustard and cress in our childhood, and which germinated here yes, and there no.
At the back end of the restaurant Tildy was refilling the mustard pots and Aileen was quartering pies.
Tildy looked up and saw him, gasped, and pressed the mustard spoon against her heart.
Cut more into the heart of it, lad," said the trapper, for it was the venerable inhabitant of those vast wastes, who had served the bee- hunter with the banquet in question; "cut more into the centre of the piece; there you will find the genuine riches of natur'; and that without need from spices, or any of your biting mustard to give it a foreign relish.
This was very torturing indeed; and I don't think I ever felt such perfect gratification and gratitude of heart, as I did when I heard from the ship's doctor that he had been obliged to put a large mustard poultice on this very gentleman's stomach.
With the soup she brought two spoons, two plates, salt, pepper, mustard for the beef, and so on.