musculotendinous


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Related to musculotendinous: musculotendinous cuff

musculotendinous

 [mus″ku-lo-ten´dĭ-nus]
pertaining to muscle and tendon.

mus·cu·lo·ten·di·nous

(mŭs'kyū-lō-ten'di-nŭs),
Relating to both muscular and tendinous tissues.

musculotendinous

adjective Referring to the muscles and tendons.

mus·cu·lo·ten·di·nous

(mŭs'kyū-lō-ten'di-nŭs)
Relating to both muscular and tendinous tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
We consider musculotendinous overuse to be any musculoskeletal problem, whether inflammatory or not, that appears to result from excessive use, presents with pain as the major symptom.
Isotonic exercise (Phase 3) was commenced on successful completion of light isometric exercise, with inner- and midrange positions used initially to minimise excessive stretch on the musculotendinous unit.
Briefly, the rotator cuff tendons of the rats were exposed and a suture was placed through each of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus at the musculotendinous junction to control the tendon stumps after detachment.
A rupture of the quadriceps tendon was identified at the musculotendinous transition zone.
Almeida, "Conservative interventions for treating exercise-related musculotendinous, ligamentous and osseous groin pain," The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, vol.
From the perspective of the human biomechanics aspect, one of the important features is the physical properties of the musculotendinous and their resulting impedance.
There are also extra-articular structures that support and influence the knee joint (synovium, capsule, ligaments and musculotendinous units).
Due to the subcutaneous location of the tibia and its close proximity to vital neurovascular and musculotendinous structures, limb salvage surgery can be difficult to achieve in tibia bone malignancies.
The use of anabolic steroid for individuals with vigorous strength training may increase the disproportionate strength of muscle to tendon at the musculotendinous junction and of the insertional site, making these tendons more susceptible to injury [2].
In addition, three of the seven studies reported significant reductions in musculotendinous and ligament injuries following a static stretching protocol.
Primary germ plasm defect theory attributes this to defect in Talus causing continued plantar flexion and inversion, leading to soft-tissue changes in the joints and musculotendinous complexes.
MAS measures both the nonneural biomechanical and musculotendinous stiffness and the neural component of hyperexcitable stretch reflex [20].