muscles of ventilation

muscles of ventilation

Etymology: L, musculus + respirare, to breathe
muscles that provide inspiration, partly by increasing the volume of the chest cavity so that air is drawn into the lungs, including the diaphragm and external intercostal muscles. They are aided during forced breathing by the scalenus muscles, levatores costarum, sternocleidomastoid, pectoralis major, platysma myoides, and serratus superior posterior. Muscles of forced expiration include the external and internal oblique, rectus abdominis, and transverse abdominis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pulsus paradoxus is absent because accessory muscles of ventilation are not in use.
During physical examination of the chest, inspection often reveals decreased chest wall expansion, use of accessory muscles of ventilation, and, depending on the size of the atelectatic area, tracheal and mediastinal shift toward the affected region.
When the muscles of ventilation (diaphragm and external intercostal muscles) become affected in ALS, respiratory failure is generally inevitable, requiring a tracheotomy and mechanical ventilation.
Other causative factors of chronic cor pulmonale include: obstructive and central sleep apnea, kyphoscoliosis, neuromuscular diseases affecting muscles of ventilation, diffuse pulmonary interstitial fibrosis, pneumoconiosis, cystic fibrosis, and primary pulmonary hypertension.
Other clinical manifestations include hoarseness, restlessness, rapid ventilatory rate, use of accessory muscles of ventilation, intercostal and suprasternal retractions, and nasal flaring.