muscle synergy

muscle synergy

, muscular synergy
The association of several muscle groups contracting simultaneously as a single functional unit, e.g., the back, trunk, abdominal, and leg muscles working together to maintain balance while walking.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beer, "Alterations in upper limb muscle synergy structure in chronic stroke survivors," Journal of Neurophysiology, vol.
However, less is known how the muscle synergy is affected, if the selected muscle group is strengthened.
Fundamentally, a muscle synergy consists of a time-invariant weighing coefficient wk and a time-varying activation coefficient [c.sup.r.sub.k](f).
Artemiadis, "Proportional myoelectric control of robots: muscle synergy development drives performance enhancement, retainment, and generalization," IEEE Transactions on Robotics, vol.
In general, the brain needs to coordinate the degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system during movement [8], and muscle synergy is hypothesized to manage the problem with degrees of freedom [9].
Furthermore, one previous study investigated the change in muscle synergy in patients after chronic stroke [18].
The nature of muscle synergy in task planning and execution may help to elucidate the question of how to activate a group of relevant muscles to best achieve stroke rehabilitation.
Muscle synergy is defined as a specific and consistent spatiotemporal pattern of muscle activations that leads to similar joint trajectories (Ting and McKay, 2007) and have been proposed as a neural strategy for simplifying the neuromuscular control.
At B-level muscle synergy controls the two-dimensional joint bend and has to synchronize the action of at least two muscles: extensor and flexor.
They are (This is sometimes described as designed to fatigue one element of "supersets") a muscle synergy prior to performing more resistance training on the whole movement pattern.
These studies show the importance of considering different intensities and durations of sEMG bursts, temporal patterns, strength of the muscle contraction [10], and muscle synergy as a framework for sEMG patterns of hand postures.