muscle relaxant


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relaxant

 [re-lak´sant]
1. causing relaxation.
2. an agent that causes relaxation.
muscle relaxant an agent that specifically aids in reducing muscle tension.

mus·cle re·lax·ant

a drug with the capacity to reduce muscle tone; may be either a peripherally acting muscle relaxant such as curare and act to produce blockade at the neuromuscular junction (and thus useful in surgery), or act as a centrally acting muscle relaxant exerting its effects within the brain and spinal cord to diminish muscle tone (and thus useful in muscle spasm or spasticity).

muscle relaxant

an agent that reduces the contractility of muscle fibers. Curare derivatives and succinylcholine compete with acetylcholine and block neural transmission at the myoneural junction. These drugs are used during anesthesia, in the management of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, and in shock therapy, to reduce muscle contractions in pharmacologically or electrically induced seizures. Several drugs that relieve muscle spasms act at various levels in the central nervous system: baclofen inhibits reflexes at the spinal level; cyclobenzaprine acts primarily in the brainstem; and the benzodiazepines reduce muscle tension, chiefly by acting on mechanisms that control muscle tone. Dantrolene acts directly on muscles in reducing contraction and apparently achieves its effect by interfering with the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

muscle relaxant

Anesthesiology An agent used in anesthesiology to facilitate airway management, control alveolar ventilation, abolish motor reflexes, and provide the muscle relaxation. Depolarizing agents, eg succinylcholine, cause a prolonged depolarization of the motor end plate. Nondepolarizing agents, eg pancuronium, are competitive inhibitors of acetylcholine at the motor end plate See Depolarizing agent, Nondepolarizing agent.

mus·cle re·lax·ant

(mŭsĕl rĕ-laksănt)
Drug able to reduce muscle tone; may be either a peripherally acting muscle relaxant or act centrally acting.

mus·cle re·lax·ant

(mŭsĕl rĕ-laksănt)
Drug with capacity to reduce muscle tone; may be either a peripherally acting muscle relaxant such as curare and act to produce blockade at the neuromuscular junction (and thus useful in surgery), or act as a centrally acting muscle relaxant exerting its effects within the brain and spinal cord to diminish muscle tone (and thus useful in muscle spasm or spasticity).

muscle relaxant

an agent that specifically aids in reducing muscle tone. Most such agents inhibit the transmission of nerve impulses at the somatic neuromuscular junctions. They include tubocurarine, gallamine, pancuronium, succinylcholine and decamethonium bromide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eperisone is a muscle relaxant, with a mechanism of action slightly different from that of other muscle relaxants.
After administration of muscle relaxant for intubation, in the time of recovery muscle strength must be fully recovered for normal spontaneous breathing.
Despite the use of strict protocol to evaluate adequate reversal of an intermediate-acting muscle relaxant with careful clinical examination, clinicians were consistently unable to achieve acceptable levels of neuromuscular recovery in the operating room.
It requires to use aminosteroid type of muscle relaxant like vecuronium.
Rocuronium Bromide a non-depolarizing muscle relaxant (NDMR) as an alternative to Suxamethonium chloride, a depolarizing muscle relaxant (DMR) for the purpose of intubation of trachea with emphasis on onset of time for muscle relaxation, duration of action, hemodynamic changes and complications if any.
In their 1971 publication 18, these authors performed similar research in 26 patients undergoing muscle relaxant surgery and introduced the concept of a TOF ratio where the height of the fourth twitch was presented as a percentage of the height of the first as an indication of the degree of neuromuscular block.
Guaifenesin has anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant properties.
Additionally, the company said its Atracurium Besylate Injection is a nondepolarizing skeletal muscle relaxant.
Pancuronium is an extremely effective muscle relaxant when used in an appropriate hospital setting, but when used for executions, there is the very real possibility of causing extreme pain and suffering in a paralysed prisoner.
As noted above, cyclobenzaprine is a muscle relaxant, whereas cyclosporine is an immunosuppressive agent.
This is the absolute indication for their use, and the debate revolves around the technique in particular: which muscle relaxant should be used?
NBC News in New York reported that the medical examiner said the child victim, Leiby Kletzky, was given muscle relaxant, anti-psychotic drugs, painkillers and Tylenol before he was smothered to death and dismembered.