muscle dysmorphia


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A specific type of body dysmorphic disorder in which a person—usually male, average age 20—becomes obsessed with building muscle to the point where it impacts on his/her interactions with others, employment and his self-image. It is regarded as a treatment-resistant mental disorder, which typically occurs in bodybuilders who, while very muscular and physically fit, see a '97-pound weakling' in the mirror
Risk factors Bullying during primary, secondary school, family dysfunction, perfectionism, severe stress, aesthetic focus and negative influence of mass culture that promotes an idealised Arnold Schwarzenegger-type body
Management Antidepressants

muscle dysmorphia

Sports medicine A mental disorder seen in bodybuilders who, although very muscular and physically fit, still see the proverbial “90-pound weakling” when viewing themselves in the mirror Management Antidepressants. Cf Anorexia nervosa.

muscle dysmorphia

, muscle dysmorphic disorder
A body image disorder principally experienced by males, characterized by excessive fear about one's body size, esp. a concern that one's muscles are not large enough. Boys affected by muscle dysmorphia often take drugs, e.g., androgenic or anabolic steroids, to increase their body size. The syndrome is also known colloquially as bigorexia or vigorexia.
Synonym: reverse anorexia See: body dysmorphic disorder

Muscle dysmorphia

A subtype of BDD, described as excessive preoccupation with muscularity and body building to the point of interference with social, educational, or occupational functioning.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scientists said these behaviors may lead to muscle dysmorphia if they are left unchecked.
If neglected or left unchecked, these behaviours may escalate to muscle dysmorphia, characterized by rigid diet, obsessive over-exercising and extreme preoccupation with the physique.
The people affected by muscle dysmorphia (MD) suffer from a mental disorder in which a distortion of the body image in the form of its underestimation prevails (Pope, Phillips, & Olivardia, 2000), recently this disorder has been introduced as an Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in DSM-V (Rodriguez-Testal, Senin-Calderon, & Perona-Garcelan, 2014).
Neuropsychological Study of Muscle Dysmorphia and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
University courses, eating problems and muscle dysmorphia: are there any associations?
This, in turn, causes dissatisfaction with both body muscularity and body fat, leading to consequent development of thinness- and muscularity-focused pathology, include eating disorders (Ricciardelli & McCabe, 2004), muscle dysmorphia (Murray et al., 2012; Pope et al., 2005;) and anabolic steroid use (Kanayama, Hudson & Pope, 2012; Parent & Moradi, 2011; Smolak & Stein, 2010).
(2008); Big Men Feeling Small: Childhood bullying experience, Muscle Dysmorphia And Other Mental Health Problems; Psychology Of Sports And Exercise.
Someone who suffers from muscle dysmorphia becomes obsessed with working out and body building because they think they need to achieve extreme fitness goals to be comfortable with their body.
Muscle dysmorphia and use of ergogenics substances.
This may be particularly relevant given that physical activity is an important and desirable health behavior (Loprinzi, 2015), yet also associated with potentially maladaptive behaviors and consequences (e.g., exercise addiction, muscle dysmorphia; Ebbeck, Watkins, Concepcion, Cardinal, & Hammermeister, 2009; Goodale, Watkins, & Cardinal, 2001; Readdy, Watkins, & Cardinal, 2011).
Muscle dysmorphia risk goers academies from downtown Sao Paulo