murmur


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Related to murmur: heart murmur

murmur

 [mer´mer]
an auscultatory sound, benign or pathologic, loud or soft, particularly a periodic sound of short duration of cardiac or vascular origin.
aortic murmur a sound indicative of disease of the aortic valve.
apex murmur (apical murmur) a heart murmur heard over the apex of the heart.
arterial murmur one in an artery, sometimes aneurysmal and sometimes constricted.
Austin Flint murmur a loud presystolic murmur at the apex heard when aortic regurgitation is preventing the mitral valve from closing; called also Flint's murmur.
blood murmur one due to an abnormal, commonly anemic, condition of the blood. Called also hemic murmur.
cardiac murmur heart murmur.
cardiopulmonary murmur one produced by the impact of the heart against the lung.
continuous murmur a humming heart murmur heard throughout systole and diastole.
crescendo murmur one marked by progressively increasing loudness that suddenly ceases.
Cruveilhier-Baumgarten murmur one heard at the abdominal wall over veins connecting the portal and caval systems.
diastolic murmur a heart murmur heard at diastole, due to mitral obstruction or to aortic or pulmonic regurgitation with forward flow across the atrioventricular valve; it has a rumbling quality.
Duroziez's murmur a double murmur during systole and diastole, palpated over the femoral or another large peripheral artery; due to aortic insufficiency.
ejection murmur a systolic murmur heard predominantly in midsystole, when ejection volume and velocity of blood flow are at their maximum; it is produced by ejection of blood into the pulmonary artery and aorta.
Flint's murmur Austin Flint murmur.
friction murmur friction rub.
functional murmur a heart murmur occurring in the absence of structural changes in the heart, usually due to high cardiac output states. Called also innocent murmur and physiologic murmur.
Gibson murmur a long rumbling sound occupying most of systole and diastole, usually localized in the second left interspace near the sternum, and usually indicative of patent ductus arteriosus. Called also machinery murmur.
Graham Steell murmur a high-pitched diastolic murmur due to pulmonic regurgitation in patients with pulmonary hypertension and mitral stenosis.
heart murmur see heart murmur.
hemic murmur blood murmur.
innocent murmur functional murmur.
machinery murmur Gibson murmur.
mitral murmur a heart murmur due to disease of the mitral valve; it can be either obstructive or regurgitant.
musical murmur one that has a periodic harmonic pattern; it may be either a heart murmur or a vascular murmur.
organic murmur one due to a lesion in the organ or organ system being examined, e.g., in the heart, in a blood vessel, or in lung tissue.
pansystolic murmur a regurgitant murmur heard throughout systole, due to blood flow between two chambers normally of very different pressures in systole; the most common causes are mitral regurgitation, tricuspid regurgitation, and ventricular septal defects.
physiologic murmur functional murmur.
prediastolic murmur one occurring just before and with diastole, due to aortic regurgitation or pulmonic regurgitation.
presystolic murmur one shortly before the onset of ventricular ejection, usually associated with a narrowed atrioventricular valve.
pulmonic murmur one due to disease of the pulmonary valve or artery.
regurgitant murmur a heart murmur due to a dilated valvular orifice with consequent valvular regurgitation.
seagull murmur a raucous murmur resembling the call of a seagull, frequently heard in aortic stenosis or mitral regurgitation.
Still's murmur a functional heart murmur of childhood, with a buzzing or vibratory tone heard in midsystole; it usually disappears by puberty.
systolic murmur a heart murmur heard at systole, usually due to mitral or tricuspid regurgitation or to aortic or pulmonary obstruction.
to-and-fro murmur a friction sound or murmur heard with both systole and diastole.
tricuspid murmur a heart murmur caused by disease of the tricuspid valve; it may be either obstructive or regurgitant.
vascular murmur one heard over a blood vessel.
vesicular murmur vesicular breath sounds.

mur·mur

(mer'mĕr), Avoid the misspelling murmer.
1. A soft sound, like that made by a somewhat forcible expiration with the mouth open, heard on auscultation of the heart, lungs, or blood vessels. Synonym(s): susurrus
2. An other-than-soft sound, which may be loud, harsh, or frictional; organic cardiac murmurs may be soft or loud and harsh; pericardial murmurs usually are frictional and are more properly described as "rubs" rather than murmurs.
[L.]

murmur

(mûr′mər)
n.
1. A low, indistinct, continuous sound: spoke in a murmur; the murmur of the waves.
2. An indistinct, whispered, or confidential complaint; a mutter.
3. Medicine An abnormal sound, usually emanating from the heart, that sometimes indicates a diseased condition.
v. mur·mured, mur·muring, mur·murs
v.intr.
1. To make a low, continuous, indistinct sound or succession of sounds.
2. To complain in low mumbling tones; grumble.
v.tr.
To say in a low indistinct voice; utter indistinctly: murmured his approval.

mur′mur·er n.
mur′mur·ing·ly adv.
mur′mur·ous adj.
mur′mur·ous·ly adv.
An auscultatory sound of cardiac or vascular origin, usually caused by an abnormal flow of blood in the heart due to structural defects of the valves or septum; murmurs may be benign or pathological

murmur

Heart murmur Cardiology An auscultatory sound of cardiac or vascular origin, usually caused by an abnormal flow of blood in the heart due to structural defects of the valves or septum; murmurs may be benign or pathological. See Austin Flint murmur, Cardiopulmonary murmur, Cooing murmur, Graham Steel murmur, Innocent murmur, Late systolic murmur, Machinery murmur, Middiastolic murmur, Millwheel murmur, Musical murmur, Pistol shot murmur, Regurgitant murmur, Roger's murmur.

mur·mur

(mŭr'mŭr)
An abnormal, usually periodic sound heard on auscultation of the heart or blood vessels.
[L.]

murmur

A purring or rumbling sound of variable pitch heard through a STETHOSCOPE especially over the heart or over a narrowed or compressed artery. Murmurs are caused by turbulence in blood flow and often imply disease such as heart valve narrowing or incompetence. See also HEART SOUNDS.

Murmur

An abnormal heart sound that can reflect a valve dysfunction.
Mentioned in: Aortic Valve Stenosis

mur·mur

(mŭr'mŭr)
1. A soft sound, like that made by a somewhat forcible expiration with the mouth open, heard on auscultation of the heart, lungs, or blood vessels.
2. An other-than-soft sound, which may be loud, harsh, or frictional.
[L.]

Patient discussion about murmur

Q. What is a Heart Murmur? My friend told me that some people have a heart murmor and it is normal. Is that possible? What is a heart murmur?

A. A heart murmur is a sound that is created by inadequate blood flow through the heart and its large vessels, for example the aorta. Some are born with a heart murmur and further testing doesn't reveal any significant problem. This is called a physiological murmur.
http://www.5min.com/Video/What-is-Innocent-Heart-Murmur-5501

Q. How are Heart Murmurs Classified? What are the characteristics of different heart murmurs?

A. Heart murmurs are charachterized by their location, their strength, their timing, whether or not they radiate and so on. For example, this is a sound of a heart murmur compatible with a disease called aortic stenosis-
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/medther/Cardiology/audio/as.wav
Notice that the murmur begin with the heart sound and lasts all through the beat.

More discussions about murmur
References in periodicals archive ?
Austrian medical company eMurmur reported on Wednesday the receipt of CE mark certification for its flagship eMurmur ID technology to detect and classify heart murmurs with expert-level accuracy.
These results have changed the way vets look at heart disease as half of the dogs they see with a medium-severe to severe heart murmur can remain symptom free for over a year longer than previously.
Physical examination by the primary care health team revealed that the ejection systolic murmur was loudest over the pulmonary area.
Until recently, we would have noted the appearance of a symptomless heart murmur on the patient's clinical record, advised the owner of the possibility of illness developing and suggested more regular heart checks.
Two-year-old Sheldon was diagnosed with the grade five heart murmur but vets are unsure what is causing it.
"A heart murmur can be a sign of underlying valve or structural heart disease, such as congenital heart disease--a hole in the heart or other complication," explains Cleveland Clinic cardiologist and heart imaging specialist Christine Jellis, MD.
"What you're hearing as a murmur is similar turbulent blood flow that results from the high-velocity regurgitation of blood backward across the valve, opposite of the direction the blood is supposed to flow."
If it is not then she may not have efficient oxygen exchange in the lungs from congestion due to the backflow of blood at the site of the murmur. If the sleeping respiratory rate is above 30 per minute she needs to be seen by your vet and will probably start medications at that time.
other murmurs. Here I burn among the screams in the world I invented.
A thorough assessment of the neonate presenting with an asymptomatic heart murmur to ensure that, where possible, infants with duct dependent CHD (2) are not discharged home inappropriately.
A A MURMUR is an abnormal heart sound that is caused by increased blood flow through either the valves of the heart or a hole in the heart.
Heather Farrell was born with a heart murmur but still went on to become a winner.