multivalent

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Related to multivalency: valence

multivalent

 [mul″ti-va´lent]
1. having a valence of two or more.
2. denoting an antiserum, vaccine, or antitoxin specific for more than one antigen or organism; called also polyvalent.

mul·ti·va·lent

(mŭl'tē-vā'lent),
1. In chemistry, having a combining power (valence) of more than one hydrogen atom.
2. Efficacious in more than one direction.
3. An antiserum specific for more than one antigen or organism.
4. Antigen or antibody with a combining power greater than two.
Synonym(s): polyvalent (1)

multivalent

(mŭl′tĭ-vā′lənt, mŭl-tĭv′ə-lənt)
adj.
1. Genetics Of or relating to the association of three or more homologous chromosomes during the first division of meiosis.
2. Chemistry & Immunology Polyvalent.

mul′ti·va′lence n.

mul·ti·va·lent

(mŭl'tē-vā'lĕnt)
1. chemistry Having a combining power (valence) of more than one hydrogen atom.
2. Efficacious in more than one direction.
3. Any antiserum specific for more than one antigen or organism.
Synonym(s): polyvalent (1) .

multivalent

(of chromosomes) forming an association during prophase 1 of MEIOSIS. Compare BIVALENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
The contrast between these two interpretations leaves us with an undecided state of what I call "semiotic multivalency." This allows the film to become a cross-roads of cross-cultural philosophy, psychology, and religion, which makes for a remarkable place to begin comparative dialog.
In Albert Hofstadter's translation of Heidegger's essay, Riss is often rendered as "rift-design" in English, and it is clear that Heidegger himself is playing up the multivalency of the term.
It is because they symbolize both the sacrifice of the dead and the ambitions of the living that such monuments retain their multivalency across both North and South and the years themselves.
The multivalency of art's role in arid zone society is recognised, being both secular/casual and sacred/ceremonial (Gunn 2000).
And though Grace Tiffany concedes that her review of the multivalency embedded in the names of the principal characters of the play might not yield any "new" insights into the characters, it at least underscores the polyphony the play invites and challenges its audiences, both early modern and modern, to hear (365).
Much more research needs to be done on the multivalency of the satanic paradigm in contemporary African contexts, (35) its communicative networks, its gendered aspects, and implicit political and social critique.
Further research is required into the role of ecstasy in Egyptian and other religions, including the importance of tabu-breaking for certain magical purposes, and into the multivalency of the snake as a symbol of death, rebirth, and transformation.
Owing to its ideological multivalency and the social inclusiveness of its clientele, the popular theater of the Elizabethan and early Jacobean era has been widely regarded as an authentically national institution, one of the key sites where a sense of collective identity was forged.
The multivalency of the names of his parents, however, already suggests their ambiguous outcast position, one resting between natural poverty and delinquency, which their son will also eventually occupy.
Multivalency is a geographical, social, and cultural fact, not merely aesthetic pastiche.
Dorothea may represent multivalency in the face of Casaubon's antiquated conception of history, but when one considers Eliot's enthusiasm for and participation in the Young Hegelian movement, Dorothea takes on the aspect of a post-Christian consciousness that is aware of the historicity of the theological stage of human development.
Closely focusing on language and form actually works against myopia in theoretically informed reading because one must attend to the multivalency of located words' contextual use value.