multivalence


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mul·ti·va·lence

, multivalency (mŭl'tē-vā'lens, -vā'len-sē),
The state of being multivalent.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mul·ti·va·lence

, multivalency (mŭl'tē-vā'lĕns, -vā'lĕn-sē)
The state of being multivalent.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
163, who is sensitive to the darker aspects of the urination dream, does not bring out its multivalence; nor does G.
This multivalence, it appears, is not a coincidence as the director was admittedly inspired by David Lynch who famously leaves his films' interpretation up to the viewer.
She emphasizes the centrality of the body--individual bodies as well as the collective bodies of believers--in Baptist faith and identity; the varieties of doctrines and works; and the multivalence of conversion, ritual, and godly community.
Although rendering literary character is always a formidable task, Hawthorne's highly allusive prose and his penchant for verbal multivalence serve to anchor his protagonists solidly within Anglo-American traditions of reference and language--grounding his cast of characters in cultural and linguistic contexts from which it is highly difficult to extricate them.
With a nod to theorists such as Yi-Fu Tuan, Michel de Certeau, and Pierre Bourdieu, the authors suggest that "places, like their inhabitants, are redolent with contradiction and with the multivalence of the past" (16).
In some ways, our relationship to televised Jewishness, and to cool Jewz like SJP who populate the television landscape, is one of multivalence, ambivalence, and ambiguity.
Through an exploration of Invisible Man and the posthumous Juneteenth, Rankine argues that Ellison's classicism "performed just the opposite function of what his critics claim." He begins with an examination of classical literature to demonstrate their multivalence and adaptability, and how these characteristics might appeal to African American writers.
(22) The addresses are: Radway, "What's in a Name?"; Kelley, "Taking Stands: American Studies at Century's End"; Frisch, "Prismatics, Multivalence, and Other Riffs on the Millennial Moment"; Sanchez, "Working at the Crossroads"; Sumida, "Where in the World Is American Studies?"; Kaplan, "Violent Belongings and the Question of Empire Today"; and Fisher Fishkin, "Crossroads of Cultures: The Transnational Turn in American Studies."
The notorious difficulty in establishing the locus of value in Don Quixote should alert us to the tremendous influence a translator may have in tipping the balance in what is obviously a delicate equilibrium of ambiguity and multivalence. (1) Burton Raffel, the translator of the 1995 Norton edition of the novel, acknowledges in the Introduction the importance of recreating in English the Spanish elements of the novel: "I want this translation to sound like it's set in Spain to feel as Spanish as possible....
He recommended using multivalence when evaluating art and crafts.
Her distinction between nobility of lineage and nobility of merit helps the reader to understand the multivalence of the term nobility which undergirds her brilliant analysis of its role in Porete's text.