multiple endocrine neoplasia


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neoplasia

 [ne″o-pla´zhah]
the formation of a neoplasm.
cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) dysplasia of the cervical epithelium, often premalignant, characterized by various degrees of hyperplasia, abnormal keratinization, and the presence of condylomata.
multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) a group of rare hereditary disorders of autonomous hyperfunction of more than one endocrine gland. In Type I (MEN I), called also Wermer's syndrome, there are tumors of the pituitary, parathyroid gland, and pancreatic islet cells in association with a high incidence of peptic ulcer. Type II (MEN II), called also Sipple's syndrome, is characterized by medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, pheochromocytoma, often bilateral and multiple, and parathyroid hyperplasia. Type III (MEN III), called also mucosal neuroma syndrome, resembles Type II except that parathyroid hyperplasia is rare, the mean survival time is shorter, and there may be neuromas and neurofibromas. All forms are transmitted as autosomal dominant traits.

multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN),

a group of disorders characterized by functioning tumors in more than one endocrine gland.

multiple endocrine neoplasia

See MEN.

mul·ti·ple en·do·crine ne·o·pla·si·a

(MEN) (mŭlti-pĕl endō-krin nēō-plāzē-ă)
A group of disorders characterized by functioning tumors in more than one endocrine gland.

Multiple endocrine neoplasia

Abnormal tissue growth on one or more of the endocrine (hormone-secreting) glands.

mul·ti·ple en·do·crine ne·o·pla·si·a

(MEN) (mŭlti-pĕl endō-krin nēō-plāzē-ă)
Group of disorders characterized by functioning tumors in more than one endocrine gland.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with pheochromocytoma also need to be evaluated for multiple endocrine neoplasias and genetic mutations which could affect their offspring or relatives as well as increasing the rate of recurrence.
van Beekum et al., "The multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) tumor suppressor regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor [gamma]-dependent adipocyte differentiation," Molecular and Cellular Biology, vol.
Pituitary Adenomas in Adolescent Patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Types I.
Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2a was identified in 2% of the younger patients, MEN type 2b was seen in 2%, neurofibromatosis in 3%, and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B mutations in 2%.
In contrast, testing an individual with multiple endocrine neoplasia type-2 (MEN-2) for the RET proto-oncogene can avoid medullary carcinoma if the individual is positive and undergoes a prophylactic thyroidectomy.
The association between these tumors might be due to a Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN).
Familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (FMEN1) is an inherited disorder that affects the endocrine glands.
While type 1 diabetes is clearly associated with a low bone mineral density, data regarding BMD in persons with type 2 diabetes is variable.3,4 Poly glandular autoimmune (PGA) syndrome 1 may present with both hypoparathyroidism and type 1 diabetes (along with candidiasis and adrenal insufficiency).5 Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) may involve parathyroid hyperplasia and pancreatic tumours (MEN 1 or Wermer syndrome).6
There were no characteristics of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome either clinically or histologically.
These gene mutations have been identified as part of Von Hipple Lindau syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia, neurofibromatosis type 1, and paragangliomas syndrome.
Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by primary hyperparathyroidism, enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, and anterior pituitary adenomas.
There were 63 miscellaneous diagnoses referred to the endocrine unit: six (9.5%) were for familial dyslipidemias, 45 (71.4%) for metabolic syndrome, 5 (7.9%) for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, 3 (4.8%) for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, and 4 (6.3%) for autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes.

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